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Dutch Design Label Freshfiber Launches New Collection of 3D Printed Nylon Lamps

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Dutch lifestyle brand and design label Freshfiber has long been on board with 3D printing applications in the consumer goods market – it’s been selling 3D printed products in its stores for a decade now. Last year we told you about the Amsterdam company’s collection of 3D printed Apple Watch bands, and we were just informed that Freshfiber has recently launched a new collection of 3D printed lighting.

Freshfiber’s creative director, Matthijs Kok, explained that the company’s international network of designers works to create watch bands, phone cases, and lighting, with all of the products designed and manufactured in Europe.

“With our unique products we bring state of the art technologies such as 3D printing to stores worldwide,” Kok told 3DPrint.com.

The unique lighting collection consists of three different lamp designs: the Fold, the Flux, and the ZooM, all of which are 3D printed and hand-finished. To create the premium collection, Freshfiber married modern 3D printing methods with delicate designs and high-quality materials. Each design comes in different sizes and models, such as floor, suspended, or table, and would look great in any space – residential or otherwise – looking for a more contemporary feel.

Pre-orders, which are expected to begin shipping this September, can be placed on the Freshfiber website.

The versatile Fold Lamp, which was designed by Kok himself, is simple but attractive, and basically combines two lamps into one. Kok was inspired by “atmospheric illumination” in his design, with an urge to make a lamp that can be adjusted to its particular surroundings.

The steel base makes it possible for the nylon lampshade to rotate a full 360° around the light, and the lamp can create a strong, functional light, in addition to an indirect light that shines through the overlapping layers; this softer light is better for a less bright ambiance. Users can control both the direction and the intensity of the €248 Fold Lamp, which makes it very flexible.

Designer Gabi Potsa created the aerial Flux Lamp, which comes in both a suspended pendant version for €215 and a table version for €281. Both versions feature “harmonious lines and smooth geometric curves” for a major statement piece in any room.

“The interlaced ribbons make up a light sculpture, which shield the illuminant and where soft light runs through, providing an alluring ambiance that will leave a lasting impression,” the website states about the Flux. “The irregular ribbons of the lamp add movement to the form and by thus create an architectural effect that always creates a different effect depending on the viewer’s perspective.”

The final lamp in the Freshfiber collection is the ZooM Lamp, designed by Michiel Cornelissen in both medium (€149) and large (€223) sizes.

The semi-transparent structure, which efficiently transmits light while also shielding users from the bright glare of the bulb, is created by “hundreds of repeating elements” which come together in a series of “interlocking spirals.” It was created as a programmable object in generative design software, and has an interesting texture – it holds its form like a solid object, but has a flexible texture almost like textiles.

While all of the 3D printed Freshfiber lamps are beautiful and unique, I think my favorite one is the Fold Lamp – it almost reminds me of a flower starting to bloom. But the Flux Suspension Lamp, with its organic shape, is a close second. However, while the lamps themselves are very attractive, I don’t find the prices such – I think the most I’ve ever spent on a lamp is $70, which translates to about €63.

But as always, take my opinion with a grain of salt, as I’ve mentioned multiple times on 3DPrint.com that I don’t tend to spend a lot of money on clothes and furnishings. One generally gets what one pays for, and I’m sure that the 3D printed lamps from Freshfiber, each of which is a made-to-order piece, are of far higher quality than any lamp I’d pick up at a nearby big box store.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

[Images: Freshfiber]

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