MIT Launches Dyo.co for 3D Printed Jewelry – Just in time for Valentines Day

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With Valentine’s Day just about 3 weeks away, Massachusetts Institute of Technology has launched a new website called Dyo. This new site allows visitors to create their own jewelry, customize it and then have it delivered to their front doors.

3D Printing has gradually been making its way into the fashion industry, and this is just another step in that direction. The printable jewelry offered by Dyo ranges from cheaper plastics and metals such as raw brass, stainless steel, and nickle steel to more expensive metals such as silver. Items are printed with the help of Shapeways, who are known for their large marketplace of 3D printable goods.

“Today, we’re excited to announce Dyo, a new platform for customizable products that can be designed in your browser and delivered to your door,” explained a Dyo representative via their blog. “It’s all the powerful technology of Matter Remix, running in the background of a fully functional storefront. Every item of Dyo is customizable and was designed specifically for our platform, and 3D printing.”

Currently Dyo, which is an off-shoot of Matter.io, has 5 designs to choose from, starting at as low as $30 each. However, they say that you can submit your own personal ideas to an engineer for approval. According to CEO and co-founder Dylan Reid, they have hopes of getting some great design ideas in the coming weeks. They are currently allowing visitors to sign up for a newsletters in which they will send you a new product design each week.

Whether this idea catches on in time for Valentine’s Day, is yet to be seen.

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