Metal 3D Printing Intellectual Property: Desktop Metal Files Suit Against Markforged

Share this Article

As it matures, the 3D printing industry is becoming an increasingly active space in terms of its patent landscape. Intellectual property is a critical concern in the dynamic industry, with new technologies coming to market and hundreds of patents issued and, for the last couple of years, more than a thousand published annually.

IP lawsuits have not been uncommon in 3D printing, with several cases having made the headlines over the last few years as more players enter the space and provide a complex IP perspective. Courts around the world have been working to keep up with the changing patent landscape and what that means from a legal perspective. Patent damages are a real concern, and the protection of intellectual property is a serious consideration.

This week, immediately on the heels of announcing its latest major funding round, Burlington, MA-based Desktop Metal filed a lawsuit against Watertown, MA-based Markforged as well as former Desktop Metal intern Matiu Parangi. The case was filed March 19, 2018 in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts and covers patent violation as well as trade secret misappropriation.

At the heart of the suit is the claim that two patents held by Desktop Metal have been infringed upon by the Metal X 3D printer, which Markforged introduced in early 2017. These two patents, No. 9,815,118 issued November 14, 2017, and No. 9,833,839 issued on December 5, 2017, are titled, respectively, “Fabricating Multi-Part Assemblies” and “Fabricating an Interface Layer for Removable Support.” The full story is available in the in-depth case filing, which I accessed here. The Complaint includes a full history of the companies’ relationships and details of the alleged trade secret misappropriation, suspected to have been an exchange of information between Parangi and his brother, who works at Markforged. Desktop Metal is seeking a jury trial and a laid-out series of compensations for perceived damages.

While both companies responded to inquiry, neither was able to provide additional comment at this time due to the sensitive nature of a current legal case.

Desktop Metal parts seen at RAPID + TCT 2017 with the ceramic layer clearly visible [Photo: Sarah Goehrke]

Desktop Metal has provided brief background on the case, including a statement from CEO Ric Fulop:

“Metal 3D printing is an exciting, quickly growing and rapidly evolving industry and, as a pioneer in the space, Desktop Metal welcomes healthy and vibrant competition. When that competition infringes on our technology, however, we have a duty to respond. We believe Markforged products clearly utilize technology patented by Desktop Metal and we will do what is necessary to protect our IP and our Company.”

[Updated to Add:]

On Friday, March 23, Markforged CEO Greg Mark issued a statement in the company blog, reading in part:

“On Monday, a competitor filed a lawsuit against us, including various far-fetched allegations. Markforged categorically denies these allegations and we will be formally responding shortly in our own court filing. Markforged is a thriving business with a dedicated team of passionate people, and we’re going to continue to execute and deliver amazing products to our customers.”

Among the exhibits included from Desktop Metal was an article I wrote following an interview with Markforged at CES 2018. Due to that inclusion, I will also refrain from commenting further on this case.

 Discuss intellectual property and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

What is Metrology Part 17: Antialiasing

Portable Microfluidic Platforms Streamline Multiple Lab On A Chip Applications



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing Offers Significant Impact on Microfluidics

Researchers present an overview of 3D printing microfluidics in the recently published ‘Functional 3D Printing for Microfluidic Chips.’ Allowing for epic ‘downscaling’ of biochemical applications—and from the lab to a...

Vienna: 3D printing Prototypes for Cutting the Cost of Lab-on-a-Chip & Organ-on-a-Chip Systems

A variety of new microfabrication methods are available now for creating rapid prototypes and new systems, and Vienna University of Technology researchers explain new research in ‘Characterization of four functional...

Evaluating Fabrication & Performance of 3D Printed Micro-Mixers Made with SLA, Polyjet and FDM

Researchers delve further into the relationship between technology, fabrication, and performance in ‘On the Impact of the Fabrication Method on the Performance of 3D Printed Mixers,’ examining how unibody lab-on-a-chip...

3D Printing Lab-on-A-Chip with Droplet Emulsion & NinjaFlex

In ‘3D Printing a Microfluidic Chip Capable of Droplet Emulsion Using NinjaFlex Filament,’ Robert Andrews from the University of Arkansas 3D prints a novel microfluidic system for his thesis project...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!