mcor technologies

With the current global push to further STEM education and encourage students to explore new technology, Mcor is right on track. Mcor Technologies is sharing their 3D printing technology and making it extremely affordable for schools in the US that purchase Mcor IRIS 3D printer education packages by December 15, 2014. With those packages, schools will receive three years of unlimited free consumables for their Mcor paper-based 3D printers.

Mcor’s mission is to take the complexities out of 3D printing so that it becomes accessible and familiar to all. Their 3D printers are unique in that they are the only devices which use paper — yes, plain old copy paper (recycled is fine or even better) — as the material for their 3D printing.

“To be effective in education, 3D printing must be accessible to all students,” said Dr. Conor MacCormack, co-founder and CEO of Mcor Technologies. “Yet, the high cost of 3D printer consumables can severely limit students’ access to 3D printing technology and be prohibitively expensive for schools. This offer enables students much wider access to our breakthrough full color, professional, paper-based 3D printers.”

Dr. Conor MacCormack, co-founder Mcor

Dr. Conor MacCormack, co-founder and CEO of Mcor Technologies

With the current offer on the table from Mcor, US schools should be highly motivated to integrate 3D printers into their curriculum. Just a basic amount of number crunching makes it clear that they will nearly break even on the cost of the 3D printers; the cost per object printed will be effectively free. Mcor 3D printers are extremely cost-effective due to minimum costs associated with running and maintaining them, which means students can do a lot more 3D printing. The Mcor 3D printers are also:

  • Safe and eco-friendly, with safe build materials, low noise level, no toxic waste
  • Easy to use and maintain
  • Professional-class quality
  • Full, true color
  • Suitable for use across multiple departments

iris_printerWith low cost, high resolution and color, and the innovative use of 3D paper printing, Mcor has a lot of offer in furthering STEM education for students, encouraging and motivating them to examine new technology, learn about the history and progression of 3D printing, and comprehend its economic and manufacturing impact.

It is hoped that with the introduction of 3D printing into schools, a higher percentage of students will be drawn into the magic of science, technology, engineering, and math — all areas offering wonderful and challenging careers for bright minds. STEM education also prepares students for the real world, enabling them to expand their minds through problem-solving and logical thinking.

The truly special technology companies are the entities made of innovative teams, comprised of engaged, passionate humans, who are part of the community effort that science and technology requires for global progression and communication. The truly special companies are the ones that give back and make an impact on young people and students.

Mcor Technologies operates internationally from offices in Ireland, the UK, and the US, and has experienced enormous expansion, as 3DPrint.com reported recently (click here to review). The MacCormack brothers state that they really see themselves as a research and design company, forming Mcor in 2004 “in a bid to democratize innovation by creating a set of accessible tools based on Selective Deposition Lamination (SDL) technology that would provide the freedom to innovate in an unlimited way.”

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