Nano Dimension Joins Techniplas Open Innovation Program, Will Use DragonFly 2020 Pro 3D Printer for Automotive Applications

Share this Article

Global design and manufacturing provider of automotive products and services Techniplas, headquartered in Wisconsin, brings 3D printing companies together to offer benefits from their shared technologies. The company is working to shape the future of mobility and is committed to open innovation, as evidenced by its open innovation program. Techniplas focuses on developing partnerships that provide 3D printing innovators mutual benefits in each other’s capabilities and strengths, and companies like Sharebot, DWS, Sicnova, ParaMatters, and Nexa3D have recently joined the program as innovation partners.

The like-minded partners in the open innovation program work together to push the boundaries of automotive manufacturing, and Techniplas announced at CES 2018 this week that Israeli 3D printed electronics leader Nano Dimension has joined the program.

“We are thrilled to welcome Nano Dimension as a member of our program which brings together today’s best and most innovative players and technologies. With Nano Dimension on board, we are the first to bring additive electronics capabilities to our automotive customers,” said George Votis, Founder and Chairman of Techniplas.

Nano Dimension is targeting the demand for electronic devices that rely on PCBs, using its unique 3D printing technology to disrupt and reshape the future of how electronics are made. The company, which was the first to embed conductive paths and print antennas into shapes and 3D print fully functioning PCBs, came on the scene with its DragonFly 2020 electronic circuit board 3D printer back in 2015. Nano Dimension ended its highly successful beta program this summer, and introduced its industrial-grade DragonFly 2020 Pro this fall.

The award-winning flagship DragonFly 2020 Pro allows for the 3D printing of functional electronics, including PCBs, antennas, sensors, conductive geometries, and molded connected devices, and is, according to a Techniplas release, “poised to transform electronic additive manufacturing by empowering companies to take control of their entire development cycle.”

Nano Dimension has joined the Techniplas open innovation program in order to make 3D printed conductive components, encapsulated sensors, and smart surfaces available to the automotive industry for the first time.

Nano Dimension CEO Amit Dror said, “Techniplas’ open innovation program is fast becoming the preeminent hub for innovative 3D printing companies to validate and mainstream their additive manufacturing solutions for the automotive industry. Together, we plan to lay the foundation for a new era of connected mobility and automotive products that are unencumbered by traditional design and manufacturing restrictions.”

PCB 3D printed by Nano Dimension [Image: Sarah Goehrke for 3DPrint.com]

As part of this new partnership, Nano Dimension will bring its DragonFly 2020 Pro 3D printer to the new Techniplas Additive Manufacturing Innovation Center in California, which also houses the company’s digital business unit. The industrial 3D printer will use its advanced inkjet engineering materials expertise in order to speed up development of cognitive, connected next-generation vehicle components, parts, and systems.

By joining the open innovation program, Nano Dimension’s 3D printed electronics and Techniplas’ cognitive lighting technology will come together to offer new ways of designing and 3D printing electronic conductive paths, in one step, right into the interior and facia surfaces of vehicles.

This week, Techniplas invites all CES 2018 attendees to stop by its booth #9100, in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center, in order to experience the combination of these two technologies firsthand. 3DPrint.com will also be at CES this week, bringing you all of the latest product and technology news right from the showroom floor.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Carnegie Mellon: Optimizing Soft Materials 3D Printing With Machine Learning

Make All the Things Part 3: Vertical Garden Part 2 – User Research



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Make All the Things Part 3: Vertical Garden Part 3 – Design Thinking

This is a short excerpt on our current stage of this vertical farm project in terms of user research. It is requiring us to put on a design oriented thought process.

3D Printing & Digital Fabrication to Play a Significant Role in World Sustainability

While sustainability for the future is a fascinating subject, it is also a critical one as we must do our best to help those currently in need in developing countries,...

The Promise of 3D Printing Sustainable Society & Development

Italian researchers from the University of Chieti-Pescara are exploring the ongoing pervasiveness of 3D printing and additive manufacturing and what that really means for the future in ‘Investigation of the...

Brazil: Researchers Test the Potential of Recycling PLA for Greater Sustainability in 3D Printing

Brazilian researchers are interested in furthering not only the benefits of 3D printing but also the advantages of PLA’s biodegradability for ease in recycling. Their findings are further outlined in...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!