Sinterit’s Lisa SLS Desktop 3D Printer Becomes Even More Accessible with Price Break

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When Michał Grzymała-Moszczyński, co-founder of Sinterit, began working with FFF 3D printers four years ago, he found there were still many limitations. Once he and the rest of the Sinterit team (notably, ex-Google employees) discovered selective laser sintering (SLS) 3D printers, they were positive about moving ahead with the technology except for one obstacle: the cost. With that in mind, they began working on their own desktop SLS 3D printer. The Lisa was born, and its creators believe that SLS 3D printing can be helpful in any industry, from automotive to architecture, and far beyond, making an impact in robotics, medicine, as well as education too.

The Lisa was the winner of the 2015 formnext Startup Challenge and was also voted 2015 Best New Polish 3D Printer, along with taking the FabCon 3.D Start-Up Award 2016. This year, Sinterit has secured an additional €1.1M funding from additive manufacturer FIT AG. The funding will help the company reach additional markets for the Lisa 3D printer, which is a rarity not only in that it’s a desktop SLS 3D printer, but it’s a plug and play SLS 3D printer that’s easy to use and ready to go right out of the box.

Support structures are not required when using the Lisa, and users can even print several models during one session. The Lisa may be simple, but it’s not limited; users can expect full design freedom, strong parts and fine details.

“The only limits are size of the print bed and your imagination,” states the Sinterit team.

Accessibility has not been an issue with the Lisa, but to further that, the team is now reducing the price significantly too, in an effort to offer more users a better solution for making high-quality 3D printed parts and objects.

“Sinterit is happy to offer access to the laser sintering technology to a bigger group of recipients, including smaller companies,” states the team.

The Lisa may have been introduced to the public just a few years ago, but already the innovative 3D printer can be found (in its upgraded version) in a variety of design studios and offices. Sinterit additionally introduced a powder sieve earlier this year to complement the Lisa. Having accessibility to SLS at the desktop is something new for many users, whether on the personal or business level, and means that they can now make their own parts without having to rely on anyone else. With the advanced technology available via the Lisa, Sinterit allows organizations of all sizes to work on projects and prototypes quickly, directly after completing the digital modeling process.

One of the greatest benefits in using a SLS 3D printer at the desktop is the level of precision that can be achieved. Numerous moving parts can be created at once, despite their complexity. The 3D prints are durable and temperature resistant.

“This technology uses prints not only for prototyping projects but also for short series or even single piece production,” states Sinterit.

Their price reduction is possible now due to the following:

  • Optimization of technological solutions
  • Modification of the distribution system
  • Launching of online sales

The new price point of €4990 (around $6,000 US) was launched early this week, and is available to all users seeking a high-quality, turnkey 3D printer.

Sinterit co-founder Grzymała-Moszczyński discusses the restructuring in this video interview:

For more information visit Sinterit, as well as following them on Facebook or YouTube.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Please join the ongoing discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com, or share your thoughts below.

[Images/video provided by Sinterit]

 

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