Recycled 3D Printing Filament Without Compromising Quality

Share this Article

Gartner suggests that there will be 6.7 million 3D printers sold by the year 2020. Assuming that 50% of these printers are desktop, material extrusion (FFF) 3D printers, and each printer uses 1 kilogram of filament per month, it can be predicted that 36 million kilograms of plastic will be used and therefore need to be extracted from natural resources in order to meet the growing demands of 3D printing.

PLA (polylactic acid) is by far the most comment filament material – it is plant-based (not fossil-based) and so is generally more environmentally friendly than other polymers. However, bioplastics compete for land with food crops and biofuels and so without proper management, the demand for 3D printing filament could challenge food and energy security in the near future. Furthermore, marketers may use words such as ‘biodegradable’, ‘sustainable’ and ‘eco-friendly’ to describe PLA, however it not that straightforward. In landfill, PLA can take hundreds of years to break down naturally. Some say PLA is ‘compostable’… well; the truth is that you’d need access to an industrial, anaerobic digester – of which there are only a handful in the UK. What about recycling PLA? Technically feasible, yes, but not practical. If PLA is sent to recycling centres, it can contaminate other waste streams, such as PET, thus making the recycled products unsalable.

The solution? Making 3D printer filament extrusion more efficient. Polymer extrusion (and manufacturing processes in general) creates waste – such as failed runs, off cuts and excess material. At Filamentive, we partner with expert polymer extrusion firms – those that make fishing lines, fencing wire and of course 3D printing filament. We ensure only homogeneous waste is used to be remanufactured into (post-industrial/pre-consumer) recycled PLA filament.

One of our biggest challenges as a planet is to find new uses for abundant waste polymers. ABS and PET are common plastics, which are subsequently discarded. Both polymers make excellent 3D printer filaments, however sadly most filament still originates from virgin sources. As a company, we find this unacceptable and feel it is our duty to ensure we can use recycled polymers wherever possible. We have partnered with local recycled centres that produce the best quality, recycled pellets for use as feedstock for Filamentive recycled ABS filament and recycled PETG filament.

All feedstock streams are meticulously checked to ensure homogeneity. During extrusion, filament is measured by lasers from 2-axes, with an alarm bell sounding if the diameter falls outside our high standards. Filament is then wound onto bulk spools for visual inspection before it is put onto the individual spools to be packaged. Each batch produced undergoes a rigorous 3D printing test; if we’re not happy with the print quality then it won’t leave the factory, simple as.

The result is up to 90% recycled filament, free of foreign debris, ±0.05mm diameter tolerances and a minimum of 95% roundness. We don’t just stop at the filament itself – we also use 100% recycled plastic spools as well as recyclable cardboard packaging. Sustainability is key to our business model and we continue to reduce our environment impact with new products and initiatives, including the return of empty spools as part of our extended producer responsibility.

We have had tremendous feedback from many 3D printing experts, and we are ready to form effective partnerships worldwide. We sell direct to customers on our website but we also provide discounts for education, 3D hubs and we are particularly interested in growing our global reseller network.

If interesting in ordering, please use code 3dprintcom for 15% off your first order! We also welcome you to ‘try before you buy’ by requested a FREE sample of either our recycled PLA, recycled ABS or recycled PETG filament.

Filamentive can be purchased in the USA from Amazon.

Discuss in the Filamentive forum at 3DPB.com.

 


Ravi Toor is the Founder and Director of Filamentive

 

Share this Article


Recent News

New Partnership: BEGO’s Dental Materials Allow Formlabs Customers to 3D Print Crowns & Bridges

Kentucky’s Somerset Community College 3D Prints in Metal on Modified FDM 3D Printers that Cost $600 Each



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

5 3D Printing for Agriculture Applications

Agriculture stands to gain more from technology than many other industries. Farming is critical to both an individual farmer’s livelihood and to the entirety of society. As such, everyone benefits...

CIA’s In-Q-Tel Invests in Markforged

Boston-based startup Markforged is growing rapidly, pulling in a whopping $82 million investment in March 2019. Now, the 3D printer manufacturer is getting some additional funds, though this time the...

Ti6Al4V in Selective Laser Melting: Analysis of Laser Polishing Techniques

Chinese researchers are expanding on new materials and technology for improving surface quality in metal 3D printing, outlining their findings in ‘Laser Polishing of Ti6Al4V Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting.’...

Tennessee Researchers Analyze Low-Cost Metal 3D Printing with Composites

Tennessee researchers have come together to pursue a more in-depth look at the science of 3D printing with metal, outlining their findings in the recently published ‘Dimensional Analysis of Metal...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!