Stanford University Joins Aether’s Research Project Collaboration, Will Receive Several Aether 1 Bioprinter Beta Units

Share this Article

aether-3d-bioprinterA couple of months ago, San Francisco startup Aether announced that they would be helping to facilitate a giant research project collaboration by donating beta units of their soon-to-be-released Aether 1 bioprinter to several universities, research institutions, and nonprofits. The donations serve several purposes: to get the Aether name out there among prominent scientific organizations, to push the advancement of accessible and inexpensive bioprinting, and to begin eliminating animal testing in favor of 3D printed tissue. (All of the institutions receiving Aether 1 printers have agreed not to carry out any animal testing for the duration of their collaborations.)

aether-3d-bioprinter-machine-vision-camera-9Aether has just added another big name to their collaborative project in Stanford University, which will receive several Aether 1 beta units for in silico modeling research at the Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and Translation. The printers will be used to 3D print biological materials for comparison with in silico, or computer simulated, cells, tissues and organs, for the purpose of validating the results of the simulations.

Aether will also monitor the research and work to create new customizations for the high-precision needs of the project, as well as developing solutions to any issues encountered. The Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and Translation will provide feedback on the printers, thus helping Aether to improve their machines before their official release.

“We were very excited to have one of the most incredible research centers on Earth express an interest in working with our soon-to-be-released Aether 1 Bioprinter,” said Aether CEO Ryan Franks. “It was fantastic to learn they specifically wanted to use Aether 1 to support research involving computer simulation models which may simulate the human body better than the current animal model. This was perfectly aligned with Aether’s mission to reduce and eliminate animal testing. This would of course be better ethically, but may also dramatically improve the speed of drug and therapy discovery, and make human clinical trials safer.”

aether-bioprinter-rf-eb-33

Aether CEO Ryan Franks (L) and CTO Eric Bennett

Not only does the Aether 1 system allow for the use of an incredible 24 extruders (2 FFF extruders, 8 syringe, and 14 droplet jet extruders) in one print, with options for additional accessories such as a UV LED lamp, laser engraver, CNC drill, microscope, and more, it’s far less expensive than most commercial bioprinters, which typically retail for around $250,000. The Aether 1 costs only $9,000. It almost sounds too good to be true, but the fact that so many revered research institutions have signed on to use it is a good indication that this is, in fact, one serious invention. Aether is currently expanding their engineering staff and planning to ship the beta units out as soon as possible.

stanford-universityThe Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and Translation is the first research facility at Stanford University to use an Aether 1 bioprinter, but a positive experience could lead to interest from the university’s other cancer and other medical research facilities. An expanded presence inside such a major university could be a huge opportunity for Aether and their goal of one day eliminating animal testing altogether. They’re not the only ones working toward that goal – several other institutions have recently developed 3D printing applications that may not only replace animal testing, but deliver better results, saving the lives of animals and humans at the same time. Discuss in the Stanford Aether forum at 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

Cartilage Tissue Engineering via Characterization and Application of Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Based Bioink

University of Sheffield: Comparative Research of SLM & EBM Additive Manufacturing with Tungsten



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Barcelona: Electrostatic Jet Deflection for Ultrafast 3D Printing

Barcelona researchers Ievgenii Liashenko, Joan Rosell-Llompart, and Andreu Cabot have come together to author the recently published, ‘Ultrafast 3D printing with submicrometer features using electrostatic jet deflection.’ Following the continued...

Cornet: Research Network in Lower Austria Explores Expanding 3D Printing Applications

Ecoplus Plastics and Mechatronics Cluster in Lower Austria has just completed their ‘AM 4 Industry’ Cornet project, outlining their findings regarding 3D printing—with the recently published work serving as the...

Additive Manufacturing: Still a Real Need for Design Guidelines in Electron Beam Melting

Researchers from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia explore the potential—and the challenges—for industrial users engaged in metal 3D printing via EBM processes. Their findings are outlined in the recently...

Metal 3D Printing Research: Using the Discrete Element Method to Study Powder Spreading

In the recently published ‘A DEM study of powder spreading in additive layer manufacturing,’ authors Yahia M. Fouda and Andrew E. Bayly performed discrete element method simulations to study additive manufacturing applications using titanium alloy (Ti6AlV4)...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!