San Draw Medical Develops Realistic 3D Printed Model for Suture Training

Share this Article

s002-training-01When 3D printing started appearing more frequently in the medical world, it was largely in the form of 3D printed organ models that allowed doctors and surgeons to plan out difficult surgeries before operating on the patient. As the technology has advanced, its applications in medicine began to develop further as well. Bioprinting may be the obvious example of how much 3D printing has changed the field, but there are plenty of other examples of how far medical 3D printing has come in a short amount of time.

3D printing for training purposes alone has advanced greatly from where it started not long ago. As printing materials become more sophisticated and diverse, training models are becoming closer to the look and feel of an actual human body, which is invaluable as a way for medical students for to practice common procedures in a realistic way without having to risk making errors on a real person. For example, San Draw Medical, which has been making a name for itself with its specialized silicone 3D printing technology, recently released a realistic-feeling 3D printed arm model so that students could practice giving injections, and now the company has followed up with a new product for suture training.

According to San Draw, while suturing is one of the most common medical procedures, the current training models fall short of simulating the anatomy and feel of a real human. To improve suture training models, San Draw worked with several doctors in the US and Taiwan to develop 3D printed alternatives to current materials used in most medical schools.

s001-3

What they came up with was an arm model 3D printed in PLA with an FDM printer, plus a replaceable skin pad created with San Draw’s silicone 3D printer. The skin pad can also be used on its own for different types and levels of suture training. According to a surgeon at Taichung Armed Forces General Hospital, the new product meets multiple critical training needs, such as mimicking the feel of suturing and ligation with realistic texture and tension feedback.

s002-trainingOne of the difficulties of creating synthetic skin that mimics real skin is that human skin is incredibly complex and made from multiple thin layers. San Draw’s product realistically simulates the hardness and density of the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis, and has the thickness necessary for both shallow and deep sutures.

While sutures may be thought of, in the grand scheme, as a relatively minor medical procedure, they can turn into a major problem if not done well. Practice may make perfect, but when it comes to getting stitches, who really wants to be a practice subject? With the realistic structures and realistic feel of San Draw Medical’s simulation models, medical students can make sure they can perform common procedures professionally, expertly and without error before they ever have to operate on a real person.

San Draw Medical’s products have been implemented by several doctors and medical facilities in Asia, but the company is looking for additional business partners to help them reach more people. If you’re interested in partnering with them, you can contact them through their website. Discuss in the San Draw Medical forum at 3DPB.com.

s001-1

s002-2

 

Share this Article


Recent News

How 3D Printing Jigs and Fixtures Transforms Manufacturing 

The Stratasys J850 3D Printer: Just Released—Designed for Designers / Also New FDM Thermoplastics



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Origin to Begin Shipping New Industrial 3D Printer, the Origin One

Today Origin will begin shipping their new Origin One, an industrial 3D printer which the San Francisco-headquartered company claims is already in high demand internationally. In fact, the developer of...

Interview with Scott Sevcik, VP Aerospace Stratasys, on 3D Printing for Aviation and Space

Out of all the possible industries that are deploying more 3D printers, aerospace is probably the most exciting. By reducing the weight of aircraft components, by iterating more, by integrating...

3D Printing News Briefs: October 14, 2019

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, everything is new, new, new! Carbon is announcing a new RPU 130 material, and STERNE Elastomere introduces its antimicrobial silicone 3D printing. Protolabs launches...

Prusa Research Releases Prusa Mini for $349

It is no secret that the entry-level 3D Printer market has been brutal. Creality, MonoPrice, and Anet continue to pump out $200 to $300 i3 clones while many companies have...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Services & Data

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!