3D Printed GRIPsher Multi-Tool Can Be Operated With One Hand, Only $35 on Kickstarter

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17828a2714bb53001c4ed334d5431a75_originalThere’s something enticing about the multi-tool, allowing you to handle nearly any scenario requiring handiness from one small central device. While they come in different sizes and shapes, it’s always fascinating to watch them unfold—and see what you can do with them, often in miniature. One thing you may have noticed, however, is that they are often tightly packed together, and not easy to open. Rather than being frustrated any further, Christian Reed, an MIT mechanical engineer and Army veteran, recently decided to fix that problem himself with a Formlabs Form 2 3D printer and an innovative new concept.

gripsherReed has recently launched the results of his efforts on Kickstarter, with a new and unique multi-tool that definitely boasts a modern and unusual-looking design, as well as showing off what happens when Army experience coincides with training in MIT engineering.

“When wearing gloves and performing other tasks simultaneously, traditional multi-tools were hard to use and operate,” Reed told 3DPrint.com. “Removing my gloves, reaching into a buttoned pocket, or not having a good place to attach it to for easy access summarizes my experience with compact multi-tools I had and tried to use.”

The GRIPsher Multi-Tool clips on nearly anywhere, securely, and can be used with just one hand—even if you still have your gloves on. And on an even more interesting note, Reed is giving the GRIPshers to veterans and service members free.

Small, lightweight, and robust, Reed’s innovation is now featured on Kickstarter in hopes of raising funds to the tune of $10,000 by November 26—a goal already easily reached, with (as of the time of editing) nearly $17,000 already pledged to the campaign with 50 days still to go. And while those in the military may receive them for free, civilians won’t have to pay much either, especially as early birds. For just $35 (the $29 early birds are already claimed), you’ll receive the GRIPsher silver model. At $37, you can add the accompanying ‘Black Jaws’ tool, while for a $42 pledge you also receive a Spyder case. At a $60 pledge, you receive one GRIPsher Black—and have one GRIPsher Military donated to a service member. Prices ascend with volume, culminating also in the Executive at $1,200, which is made out of titanium and will be delivered just a month after the campaign ends, with the option of custom engraving too. The other models will be shipped in March of 2017.

handy

one-grip

Not just a novelty, this multi-tool device—produced by Outstech—is meant to serve as a comfortable extension of the hand, allowing you to handle bolts, nuts, and wires while performing intricate tasks. You can wear it on your handy keychain, attach it to your belt, or just about anything.

 “Features and tools included were carefully thought out and refined based on actual user feedback. We wasted no time trying to stick in another ‘nail scraper’ or a ‘can opener.’ Instead, we observed which functions on a multi tool users actually use and optimized these tools to be readily accessible and functional using a single hand,” states the design team on Kickstarter.

two-grip

This 3D printed device even glows in the dark!

This 3D printed device even glows in the dark!

Several fully functional prototypes have already been created, and the team is ready to begin manufacturing. For members of the military, the Outstech team currently plans to work on distributing the devices as far and wide as they possibly can, donating remaining funds from the GRIPsher endeavor to making more of the devices to hand out as well. Check out the video below to see all that this compact, 3D printed device can do for you. Discuss further over in the 3D Printed GRIPsher forum at 3DPB.com.

https://ksr-video.imgix.net/projects/2503123/video-708985-h264_high.mp4

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