Additive Manufacturing Strategies

Nanoscribe Holds First-Ever User Meeting in US at Harvard University

ST Medical Devices

Share this Article

3dp_nanoscribe_LogoIn an industry where a majority of involved innovators are focused on making 3D printing technology better through making it bigger, the German-based company Nanoscribe GmbH is proving that printing at the micro-scale is just as vital. The company’s most prominent printer, the Photonic Professional GT, is a laser lithography 3D printer that is capable of reaching ultra high-resolution, creating layer thicknesses and detail sizes that are below a single micrometer. Their work has helped contribute to the advancement of 3D printed micro-optics as well, while their 3D printers are being utilized in the most prestigious of educational institutions, including Harvard, California Institute of Technology, Oxford, ETH Zurich, and the Imperial College of London.

Recently, Nanoscribe hosted a user meeting at Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Harvard University, marking their first-ever user meeting to take place in the United States. Working in collaboration with Harvard’s Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS), the 3D printing company invited their clients along for a two-day seminar. The CNS utilizes Nanoscribe’s laser lithography system, which has been made available to both internal and external users at the Harvard-based facility.

At this recent meeting, which was held back in June, Nanoscribe gave attendees a glimpse into their newest developments with hardware and software, while also showcasing the multitude of applications that their Photonic Professional GT 3D Printer can be utilized for, from maskless lithography to additive manufacturing. With this state-of-the-art manufacturing system, users are able to produce extremely high-resolution mesoscale objects and applications in photonics and plasmonics, which require structure sizes of just a few hundred nanometers. During the meeting, Nanoscribe’s clients presented a number of their success with Nanoscribe technology within different applications, showcasing innovative uses taking place both inside and outside of the confines of Harvard University.

Nanoscribe_UserMeeting2016_3

Lucas Meza (Caltech) speaking

“The presentations by our clients on their various applications were the absolute highlight for me. It is incredibly fascinating and enlightening to discover firsthand what different disciplinary fields are making use of our devices, which operate based on the principle of two-photon polymerization,” said Martin Hermatschweiler, the CEO of Nanoscribe. “The full scope of applications ranged from printing nanostructures at the CNS, to producing plasmonic displays at the University of Florida, to engineering new types of materials whose creation would have previously been impossible, as the scientists at Caltech presented.”

meetupnanoThus far, five of the top ten universities across the entire world are utilizing Nanoscribe technology, as they’ve quickly become the industry standard for a vast array of microfabrication needs. Their technology is particularly useful for medical technology, microoptics, microfluidics, as well as micro-rapid prototyping. Although the company started as a branch of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, in a matter of a few years, Nanoscribe is now an increasingly prominent German tech company looking to make big changes in the way we produce objects on the micro-scale. Discuss further in the Nanoscribe Photonic GT 3D Printer forum over at 3DPB.com.

[Source/Images: Nanoscribe]

 

Share this Article


Recent News

New Self-Healing Plastic for 3D Printing Epitomizes Plastic Conundrum

3D Printing Drone Swarms, Pt 11: AI-Powered Boats



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Nuclear Reactor 3D Printing Method Licensed from ORNL

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been making significant progress in 3D printing parts for use in one of the most volatile and dangerous environments:...

3D Printing Drone Swarms, Part 7: Ground & Sea Logistics

As we discuss in our ongoing 3D Printing Drone Swarms series, additive manufacturing (AM) will play an increasing role in the production of all manner of semi-sentient robots. This has...

3D Printed Oil Tanker Parts Approved after 6 Months of Evaluation Use

The oil and gas markets, along with maritime, are less exploited sectors for the additive manufacturing (AM) industry. However, progress is being made in this regard, with a group of...

The Calm Before the Swarm: Notre Dame Researcher 3D Prints Swarm of Robot Insects

The spread of blueprints for DIY gun manufacture has been one of the most infamous developments in 3D printing’s recent history. But this is, of course, far from the only...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.