Exone end to end binder jetting service

Celebrate Fallout 4 with Festive 3D Printed Mini-Nukes

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

Share this Article

014-Print to OrderWhile the debate about the ethics and legality of 3D printed guns continues to rage, I’m thankful that I have yet to hear about 3D printed nuclear bombs, although, given enough time, some crazed dictator will probably find a way to make one. (Please, please no one tell Donald Trump about 3D printing.) At the moment, it seems we’re well removed from 3D printed nuclear annihilation, but for safe and wholesome fun, you can still make 3D printed mini-nukes! Jacky Wan, guest blogger for Ultimaker, is happy to explain how.

Scarcely five months have gone by since the eagerly anticipated Fallout 4 was released, but we’ve already seen a plethora of 3D printed tributes to the game. Wan’s attention, however, was drawn less by the game itself and more by a special edition Fallout anthology pack that was released around the same time. More specifically, he was drawn to the packaging. The five games in the series came packaged in a convenient miniature nuclear bomb case, which Wan immediately decided he had to have. However, he couldn’t justify buying the entire pricey anthology just for the case, so instead he designed and 3D printed his own personal mini-nuke. This proved to be a more complicated process than he had originally expected.

nuke“I had a very specific shape, feel and size I wanted for the mini-nuke, and none of the official versions felt totally ‘right’ to me. I knew I wanted something mostly based on the Fallout 4 Nuke, but it had to include some of the essence of the anthology nuke that inspired me in the first place,” says Wan. “There were little details that bugged me about each nuke. I felt the anthology nuke had fins that were disproportionately short, the Fallout 4 nuke had too many screws, lights and segments, and the Fallout 3 nuke looked like they were stretched spheres. I was looking to make something that was carefully balanced and proportioned, and less concerned about matching any particular one.”

He drew the outline of the shell several times before he was satisfied, then created an interior profile to make the nuke hollow. The fins, screws and details were added using traditional mesh modeling techniques. He then printed the model in several parts on his Ultimaker 2 and began putting it together, but as he was doing so, he found himself wondering what the internal structure of such a bomb might look like. After a thorough and “questionable” Internet search, he found several cool cross-section images of nuclear bombs that he decided to reproduce to complement his original nuke. He took his original computer model, cut it in 2/3, and started working on a very different interior.

018-Print to Order

“This was a vastly different process since I had no references of any kind besides some really old technical drawings of real nukes. It was much more of a creative exercise,” Wan explains. “I didn’t just make random objects and throw them in there however. Each piece needed to look and feel like it serves an important role in the function of the device. And, like all my other stuff, I made it so that everything was able to snap together. With 3D printing, you’re truly free to design what you like.”

010 3D Printed Fallout Mini-Nuke PropWan, of the 3D printing site Redicubricks,  has caught our attention before with his incredible 3D designs, which include an intricate bike model and a beautifully detailed steampunk Iron Man prosthetic hand.

His completed mini-bombs are just as impressive as his other work, particularly for someone with admittedly no real knowledge about the interior structures of nuclear bombs. Both the hollow nuke and the cross section were printed in Ultimaker Metallic Silver PLA, and then painted with Liquid Mask, a rubbery, peelable substance that allows for the creation of a weathered, chipped-paint look. The finished products look like very real, rusty, weatherbeaten metal.

The files for the enclosed nuke design – which can also be used as a planter! – can be downloaded from Youmagine, while the cross-section design with internal components can be purchased in kit form for you to assemble and paint yourself – just in time to set them around your house like deadly little Easter eggs for the upcoming holiday. Discuss in the 3D Printed Mini Nuclear Bombs forum over at 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Interview: Large, Foam-Based 3D Printed Parts Now Possible with ColorFabb and Colossus

RAPID + TCT 2021 Keynotes: 3D Printing in Aerospace, Medical, & More



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

INTAMSYS at RAPID + TCT 2021: Intelligent Systems for 3D Printing Functional Materials

Industrial-grade 3D printer manufacturer and AM solutions provider INTAMSYS, founded in 2013, is all about printing high-performance parts out of high-temperature plastics at a more affordable price. As Paul Carlson,...

Featured

RAPID + TCT 2021 Day 1: FormAlloy, Protolabs, Dyndrite, & More

Finally, after what felt like a very long, long time, North America’s largest, most influential additive manufacturing (AM) event got back to business! The 30th edition of RAPID + TCT...

3D Printing News Briefs, September 21, 2021: 3D Printed COVID Test, Meatless Burgers, & More

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, some new 3D printed industry technology is being tested at Curtin Malaysia, and three partners are working to make vehicles more lightweight. Researchers have...

Massive 3D Printed Park Erected in Shenzen, China

Forget the mutually reinforcing buildup of their respective militaries – the real battle between the United States and China is in the field of 3D printing! You’ve probably heard of...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.