Candy: The First Confectionery-Focused Food 3D Printer, To Launch on Kickstarter Next Week

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It’s pretty hard to find a person who doesn’t love cake and other types of confectionery. Whether it’s chocolate, carrot, red velvet, or a plain angel food cake, there is something about the candy-2sweet flavor and moist icing which gets me just about every time.

A few weeks ago, it was my great-uncle’s 80th birthday. I helped the women in the kitchen bake him a vanilla cake, with chocolate icing – his favorite. It was a fairly large cake, as it needed to serve 35 hungry people. In the end, it turned out great, but then my cousin Becky decided to try her hand at adding some artistic flair to the top, and disaster candy-1struck!  “Happy 80th Uncle David – Here’s to 80 more,” she wrote in illegible cursive. With him being an avid golfer, even at 80-years-old, Becky decided to try and draw out a golfer, some golf clubs, and some balls. The end result was… well terrible. Needless to say, it was the thought that counted, and Uncle David loved the cake, even if the icing-drawn-golfer looked like an elephant eating grass, and the writing was completely illegible.

After all that, I thought to myself, “You know what would be perfect? A 3D printer which could print whatever the heck you wanted onto a cake”.

This morning I woke up, and to my surprise, that exact product has been announced. It will be launching on Kickstarter next week, with a London based company called 3D Ventures will be seeking funding via the crowdfunding site, for their ‘Candy’ 3D printer.

candy-feat

Candy will come in several different colors, and have the ability to print with any semi-solid food item such as chocolate, sugar paste, marzipan, etc.  It can print onto cookies, cakes and other food items, and will come equipped with an SD card filled with ready-to-print designs, or you can easily create your own.

“We’re not the first people to think of making a 3D printer for food, but we are the first to make it truly accessible as a consumer product,” says CEO and Founder Razvan Creanga. “The concept of 3D printing in general is so new, everyone is still experimenting with the technology and what it means for the future. That’s why going with confectionary design seemed like a logical entry point into food, because of how naturally creative it is.”

The printer, which is about the size of an espresso machine, and easily fits on almost any kitchen counter top, will also be very affordable at just $499. Candy can make baking fun for the whole family, as customized confections can be created with very little skill, leading to professional looking desserts without having to pay the big bucks to have them professionally created.

The Kickstarter project will be launching in the coming week. Further details will be provided then. Let us know if you plan on backing this upcoming crowdfunding initiative, in the Candy 3D printer forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the video of Candy below.

candy2

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