Additive Manufacturing Strategies

China: Yiko Funeral Platform Encourages Citizens to Cremate, Offers Personalized 3D Printed Urns

ST Medical Devices

Share this Article

logo (3)One thing all humans share is mortality. And universally, many of us, as well as our cultures as a whole, deal with death, and its sadness and finality, in different ways. While there are many different emotional, spiritual, and cultural facets associated with death, there’s also the matter of business associated with it–and you guessed it, real estate. Even when you die, there’s a price-tag attached–for someone.

In highly populated countries like China–which just happens to be the most populated in the world–space is at a premium, whether you are living or dead. And while the communist nation may map out plenty in terms of what their citizens may do, as well as the famed one child per couple rule, city officials in large cities like Beijing and Shanghai have not explicity mapped out what to do with citizens after they’ve expired. And this is going to come to a head eventually, as graveyards are running out of room. What space is available costs nearly as much as buying a pricey flat, with some prices to be seen at RMB 400,000, which translates to around US $62,900.

UntitledAnd while cremation is extremely popular in China, it should perhaps become even more so as no one will have anywhere to put their dead otherwise, by the looks of things. The Chinese government is well aware, and the topic of making cremation mandatory has been a long–but so far not enforced–idea.

Ma Lei, founder of Yiko, has a clear view of the issues with burials, and is very much on board with persuading everyone else to understand why cremation is better.

“There’s no room for graveyards in China now,” says Ma. “In ten years, there will not even be enough graveyard space for the people of Shanghai.”

After working as both a real estate agent and an employee at a hospital, MA saw the issues at hand and was inspired to start his innovative business which he sees great potential for due to a faltering funeral business market in his country.

“The funeral industry has been declining for a long time, but it’s also a huge market space,” says Ma.

YikoLaunching his own campaign for cremation in China through Yiko, Ma aims to help, educate, and provide an all-in-one platform where citizens can allow his company to handle the whole process through to cremation. Yiko offers:

  • Funerary product sales
  • Cemetery plots
  • Organ donation services
  • Hospice care services
  • Counseling
  • Online genealogies

cloudHe’s employed 3D printing to help him with this end, as well, offering up the technology to entice people with curiosity, as well as allowing them to benefit from the speed, personalization, affordability factors that 3D printing offers.

A customized message and name are carved into each 3D printed funeral urn in the shape of a house siting on a cloud, guaranteed to last for a thousand years. There’s specific meaning behind the design as well, because many Chinese believe that upon death, they go to live in eternity above the clouds.

The 3D printed urns take about 12 hours to create, and they retail for 11,000 RMB, which translates to about $1,700 USD. To gain traction in the business market, Ma Lei has joined Feimalv, which is a startup accelerator from Shanghai. They assist in funding, additional resources for advancement, as well as other services. Ma Lei is working with them to build up his new business platform in the Chinese funeral market, as well as working to educate the public on the issues surrounding funerals and internment, coordinating it with Buddhist ideals more in order to both encourage and bring light to the subject.

Would you want to be remembered by a 3D Printed Urn?  Let’s hear your thoughts.  Discuss in the 3D Printed Urn Forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

Carbon’s Next Gen 3D Printers Smoother and Faster with 4K Light Engine

Quantum Computing Boosted by Nanoscribe’s New Microscale 3D Printer



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Photocentric Expands with New 3D Printer, Materials, and Partnerships

Photocentric is the inventor of, and leader in, 3D printing based on LCD screen technology. Based in Cambridgeshire, UK and Arizona, US, the company has a patent in visible light...

Featured

Electronics 3D Printing: Analysis of Rogers Corp’s New Dielectric Material for AM

Rogers Corporation (NYSE:ROG) has launched its Radix 3D Printable Dielectrics series of products at the IPC APEX EXPO 2022 currently taking place in San Diego. The materials signify an important...

To End Animal Testing, BICO & CCS Push FDA Modernization Act

As the world continues developing alternatives to animal testing like bioprinting, in vitro models of human tissues, and predictive computer models, the demand for live animal testing has become outdated...

$2M in Electronics 3D Printers Sold to Military Customer by Optomec

While we’re still not able to 3D print an entire iPhone at once, electronics 3D printing may be progressing more quickly than most people might notice. A pioneer in this...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.