The Fusion: A Portable, Open Source 3D Printer for Just $249

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fusion printerFusion Printers sells 3D printers to the public, and though they are DIY kits, the company says they’ll assist buyers “in every way possible” with their questions and concerns.

Fusion, formed in 2015 by Nate Rogers, began when the designer, entrepreneur and tattoo artist began his project to create a higher quality printer for a reasonable price.

“However, there needed to be more,” Rogers says. “A quick way to transport and upgrade the printer. And the Fusion Printer was born.”

Fusion describes itself as an active community participant in online forums from Fabric8or to Thingiverse. The key to the project, they say, is the open source RepRap movement, without which the Fusion Printer would have been impossible. Rogers says this design uses the core components of the Rep Rap machine – with several enhancements – and they’re all packaged into one kit and ready for assembly.fusion printer detail

Using a set of cutting edge components and the unique design, the Fusion Printer kits provide all necessary hardware and electronics to build a reliable, fast and smooth machine which can be disassembled in under a minute for travel.

So how much will all that functionality run you? Just $249.

The current product, the Fusion 3D printer, will be available for online ordering soon, though a few kits are available now. Availability will be expanded by a Kickstarter campaign set to debut later this year.

All the 3D printable parts for the printers are available for download on Thingiverse, but Rogers is hoping people will be respectful of the amount of work that’s gone into the design so far.

“Please don’t copy and sell this design. I’ve spent 2000+ hours these past four months just designing these printers,” Rogers says. “I’ve also Built five and have several kits available for purchase.”

As for the hardware specs on Fusion 3D printer, it features a 200 x 200 x 200 mm aluminum build plate, four Nema 17, 4000g.cm stepper motors, 3 axis V-slot aluminum and Delrin wheels, and aluminum extrusion structure, the Ramps 1.4, Arduino mega, 5 A power supply, a Bowden fed, fan cooled and J head hotend, and it’s capable of printing in multiple materials via a selection of nozzle sizes.Fusion_Reach_preview_featured

Rogers says plans are in the works for future upgrades such as a proximity sensor for auto leveling, a heated bed, an LCD screen and an SD card Reader, LED lights, and all metal plates.

“And the best part?” Rogers says. “When disassembled, the printer can fit in a briefcase, so you can take it everywhere.”

For $249, customers will receive the unsoldered kit which requires splicing matching colored wires, and with the included heat shrink, Rogers says assembly typically takes 1-2 hours to complete.

Image 956For $399, you can buy the fully-assembled and tested Fusion Printer which simply requires that the table and gantry be slid into place and bolting the table belt snug.

For an additional $25, customers can purchase a geared extruder kit which doubles the speed of the printers from from 45mm/s to 90mm/s. The LCD screen with SD card reader is an additional $25, and that allows users to operate the Fusion Printer without the need for a computer. For yet another $25, an MK2 PCB heated bed which includes 100k Thermistor and power wires pre-soldered are available as well.

You can check out the Fusion 3D Printer here on their website. We’re looking forward to catching up more when the Kickstarter campaign launches.

Will you buy this open source Fusion 3D Printer? Let us know in the Inexpensive Open Source Fusion 3D Printer forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

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