TourDeFork Unveils New 3D Printable Food Jewelry

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TdFk_Logo_website_2014When writing about 3D printing, I have come across many ideas that I would have never thought about. But this one — wearable, edible food jewelry — takes the cake! A brief perusal of jewelry on Etsy will show you that organic, natural pieces are all the rage, and I think it’s going to stay that way for a long time, as we psychologically deal with the massive repercussions of climate change. My view? Since we are losing nature, we are that much more drawn to images and experiences that highlight our connection to it. But this concept from TourDeFork, isn’t just about getting in touch with nature, it’s also about using jewelry pieces to showcase food:  anything you can imagine wearing on your body!f

TourDeFork began with culinary objects to be used while cooking, and they have only recently moved on to wearable food. Yes, that’s right. Did you just purchase an amazing luscious pint of organic blueberries? Why not consider wearing one or some of those blueberries, dangling at the edge of a very simple 3D printed ring? Well, I know, being the snack queen I am, my wearable food probably wouldn’t last long, but others might be able to gather their will power together for the duration. It’s a new idea, and I am  still warming up to it, I have to admit!

But let’s talk shop. TourDeFork uses 3D printing to make very simply designed acrylic rings that are outfitted with a spike or spikes, of sorts, on the end where you can display your chosen food item. Basically, anything goes that can slide onto that spike, so you have fresh and dried fruit options, chocolate (think, Hershey’s Kiss ring and you might be on to something!) and anything else you can imagine!Taste-Wearable-Design-4

TourDeFork designed these rings for the Italian magazine CASAfacile, and they might just be the next big thing in culinary design. Like I said, if you are used to having edible objects anywhere on your body but in your stomach, then this will not seem like an odd experience. For many people, wearing your food would be considered a novelty, and for that reason alone, the project is a great contributor to innovation and style.Taste-Wearable-Design-3-600x383

If the idea of wearing some 3D printed food rings sounds like something that fits your fashion sense, this could be your thing. Like I said, the only thing keeping me from jumping on this bandwagon is that I would probably eat the food! But that’s also the whole idea behind this project. It’s a way for us to step back and appreciate the everyday and elemental things that sustain us, and, as you know, many of these objects, like, fruit, cookies, and candy, are beautifully decorative.

3D printed edible jewelry just might be the jewelry of the future!

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