Sintercore Creates 3D Printed Magazine Extension for Glock Handgun

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11745502_397808663743583_1435408609037561197_nEarlier this year, Michigan-based Sintercore released what they called the first commercially-available 3D printed muzzle brake for the AR-15, and now the company has announced the availability of a 3D printed magazine extension for the Glock 43.

The original Glock handgun was created in 1982 by a curtain rod and military knife manufacturer, Gaston Glock, who decided to manufacture the new gun from scratch. After polling a wide range of gun experts in his native Austria, he arrived at what he believed would be the formula to improve the handgun and modernize the design of such weapons.

Glock’s gun would hold more ammunition, be more durable and reliable, easier to fire and simple to learn to operate. And it worked. The original Glock 17, a model adopted by the Austrian army, had just 36 parts and held 17 rounds in its novel magazine. The result, a lightweight, interchangeable model, captured the imagination of both military buyers and consumers.

The G43 is a single stack, 9mm pistol, and the makers say it’s “ultra-concealable, accurate and fantastic for all shooters regardless of hand size.” In the standard configuration, the gun includes a six-round magazine.

Called the 3DPlus2, this magazine extension was designed in collaboration with Eric Mutchler. Mutchler made headlines earlier this year when he created the Solid Concepts 1911, a 3D printed metal handgun.

The 3DPlus2, printed using a carbon-filled nylon material that Sintercore says is “not only durable but stronger than the pistol’s factory magazines,” adds additional rounds to the Glock 43 factory magazine.

Sintercore says the design is ergonomically correct, easy to install, and that no screws or fasteners are needed to install the device. The company says the magazine extension “simply snaps into place, working with the gun’s factory spring.” They add that it’s also easy to remove due to a hole in the bottom of the extension allows for compression of the factory spring.

According to the company, the extensions will be ready for shipment as of August, and pre-orders are being taken today for $19.95.

Whereas the company’s first commercial offering, a 3D printed Inconel alloy flash-hiding muzzle brake, was made of the high grade metal, this extended magazine features nylon material.sintercore1

The Sintercore extension add two rounds to the Glock 43’s capacity up to 8+1 rounds and extends lower than the standard baseplate. The company says 3D printing technology was critical to the process, not just as it relates to rapid prototyping and proof-of-concept concerns, but because design to production time is radically shorter.

Sintercore says the 3DPlus2 features a correct, ergonomic angle, works with the factory magazine spring and snaps into place with no screws or fasteners.

What do you think of the impact 3D printing has had on gun and gun accessory manufacturing? Let us know in the Sintercore forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

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