MatterHackers’ “Punch Out!” Solves 3D Print Removal Problems Once and For All!

Share this Article

p1

This a story on a 3D printed device that all will appreciate as good harmless fun, and some will appreciate it enough to go make one of their own. Go back to the last time you 3D printed something. Painful? Enjoyable? Probably a little of both. You completed your painstaking 3D design work, and it took many more hours than you expected.  Then you finally get to print your box7design out, but that too takes more time.  But it’s finally done printing and guess what? Now it’s time to remove your print from its print bed! Well, why not end the whole process with a bang instead of a whimper?

Were you going to grab for your glove and spatula, a time tested method to remove prints after the object has cooled? Well, there’s another kind of glove you can use instead: a boxing glove. Why worry our pretty little heads about print removal problems anymore? The good people at MatterHackers have gone ahead and solved the problem once and for all.  They’ve made a device that reflects how many people may feel after a long print job. Punch Out!  is an Automatic Print Ejector for All 3D Printers.  This ejector couldn’t be more fun — just watch the below video if you have any doubts.  It’s made from a 3D printed series of scissor mechanisms, a 3D printed boxing glove, and it is driven by a single stepper motor. When the print is ready to come off the bed, you can apply your Punch Out! device to remove it in a way that is sure to leave a smile on your face, leave you feeling in control, and help you blow off some steam in the process as well.

box3What could be easier? MatterHacker supplies all of the design files and information needed for you to make your very own Punch Out! Tyler Anderson takes us through all of his design, print, and assembling steps. He used Solidworks to design some linkages, and all of the linkage holes posted online are made to fit 9.5mm outer diameter bearings. They also include an extra 0.3mm to account for printing variations.

Anderson reports that this print project was fun and went quickly with “most
components taking less than 30 minutes to print.” Everything was fabricated using PLA, as there shouldn’t be a worry about the parts heating up during use, and he recommends the following print settings: 0.2 mm layer heights and 30% infill. A gear was added to the linkage end to actuate the scissor mechanism. He also used an old stepper motor to drive it. (A hobby servo would work too.) The total list of components, electronics, code and the rest of the process — including printing the glove itself — is here.

Who would’ve guessed that punching could make printing so enjoyable?

Let us know if you have taken on this creative and useful little project.  Discuss in the 3D Printing Punch Out Forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, July 13, 2024: Metal 3D Printer, AFWERX Award, & More

3D Printing Markets Grows 8% Year over Year



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Vision Miner Acquires its 3D Printer Supplier AddWise

Vision Miner, a provider of industrial 3D printing solutions, has announced the acquisition of AddWise, a manufacturer of 3D printers and related products, in a deal valued that the companies...

“Auto Repair Needs 3D Printing” – Harold Sears Weighs in on Auto Additive’s Launch

Despite the automotive sector’s long-time adoption of additive manufacturing (AM), the use of the technology for end parts in consumer vehicles is only just now beginning to take off. And,...

Featured

Formlabs Buys Nascent SLS 3D Printer Competitor Micronics

Formlabs, maker of accessible yet professional 3D printers, has acquired Micronics, which recently debuted with a claim of making a $2,999 3D printer. I, for one, was pretty incredulous about...

The Producers: HP’s President of 3D Printing Savi Baveja Explains How the Company is Addressing Scalability

HP (NSYE: HPQ) and the additive manufacturing (AM) industry in the US need each other. In the long run, I believe that what’s good for one will be good for...