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MatterHackers’ “Punch Out!” Solves 3D Print Removal Problems Once and For All!

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This a story on a 3D printed device that all will appreciate as good harmless fun, and some will appreciate it enough to go make one of their own. Go back to the last time you 3D printed something. Painful? Enjoyable? Probably a little of both. You completed your painstaking 3D design work, and it took many more hours than you expected.  Then you finally get to print your box7design out, but that too takes more time.  But it’s finally done printing and guess what? Now it’s time to remove your print from its print bed! Well, why not end the whole process with a bang instead of a whimper?

Were you going to grab for your glove and spatula, a time tested method to remove prints after the object has cooled? Well, there’s another kind of glove you can use instead: a boxing glove. Why worry our pretty little heads about print removal problems anymore? The good people at MatterHackers have gone ahead and solved the problem once and for all.  They’ve made a device that reflects how many people may feel after a long print job. Punch Out!  is an Automatic Print Ejector for All 3D Printers.  This ejector couldn’t be more fun — just watch the below video if you have any doubts.  It’s made from a 3D printed series of scissor mechanisms, a 3D printed boxing glove, and it is driven by a single stepper motor. When the print is ready to come off the bed, you can apply your Punch Out! device to remove it in a way that is sure to leave a smile on your face, leave you feeling in control, and help you blow off some steam in the process as well.

box3What could be easier? MatterHacker supplies all of the design files and information needed for you to make your very own Punch Out! Tyler Anderson takes us through all of his design, print, and assembling steps. He used Solidworks to design some linkages, and all of the linkage holes posted online are made to fit 9.5mm outer diameter bearings. They also include an extra 0.3mm to account for printing variations.

Anderson reports that this print project was fun and went quickly with “most
components taking less than 30 minutes to print.” Everything was fabricated using PLA, as there shouldn’t be a worry about the parts heating up during use, and he recommends the following print settings: 0.2 mm layer heights and 30% infill. A gear was added to the linkage end to actuate the scissor mechanism. He also used an old stepper motor to drive it. (A hobby servo would work too.) The total list of components, electronics, code and the rest of the process — including printing the glove itself — is here.

Who would’ve guessed that punching could make printing so enjoyable?

Let us know if you have taken on this creative and useful little project.  Discuss in the 3D Printing Punch Out Forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

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