Incredible ‘Love Lamps’ by Georgian Product Designer 3D-Printed With Transparent Resin

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lovelamps_screenSo, what happens when two lamps become one? The answer is, “More light!” (if not, “More lamps!”). Product designer Sandro Lominashvili of Tblisi, Georgia, used 3D-printed components in the most ingenious and oddly romantic way to create a chic, contemporary looking two-in-one lighting fixture. He calls it or, rather, them, the “Love Lamps.”

Lominashvili, who studied mechanical engineering at King’s College in London, UK and worked for several years for a number of architecture and design companies before setting up his own studio last year, is an ardent advocate of 3D design and printing. In his leisure time, the energetic Lominashvili studies design and architecture magazines to spot the latest trends in innovative design, sketching every day and developing ideas into successful products. He incorporates digital and manual processes, including the use of 3D modeling software like Grasshopper, SolidWorks, and Rhino, the latter of which he utilized to design the Love Lamps.

When he’s not flying solo, Lominashvili works with different craftspeople and makers both in Tbilisi and abroad, building a community of forward-thinking designers using the latest technological tools to produce a range of products. He also exhibits his work as he did with the Love Lamps, which were showcased at the Ventura Lambrate show during Milan Design Week 2015.

interlocking shade

Lominashvili’s Love Lamps are meant to represent, he explained, “the constant togetherness of couples in love.” He created three different versions of this endearing design concept. In each, the two seemingly separate lamps, they interlock or intersect in different ways via the angular arms and the shades. All were 3D printed using transparent resin as he wanted the cables, fixtures and bulbs to be visible. The design of the these individuals pieces were inspired by the classic Anglepoise Lamp, a balanced-arm lamp created by the British designer, George Cawardine in the early 1930s.

When asked why he chose 3D printing as the manufacturing method of choice for his Love Lamps, Lominashvili said, “3D printing seemed like the best option because it made it possible for the design to be very clean, with almost no extra parts, and I had very few constraints with the shape.” He chose i.materialise to do the 3D printing job as he found the printing material–in this case, the transparent resin–ideal for the Lamps.

As his studio is new, Lominashvili does not yet have an extensive portfolio that he can share via his website, but we imagine that will change as he adds new products like the Love Lamps and the sleek, Modernist chair already showcased on the site.  What do you think of these uniquely designed lamps?  Discuss in the 3D Printed Love Lamps forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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