Makerbot Products Coming to Central America, to be Sold at Makerz in Panama

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MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer

MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer

Makerz, a 3D printing store in Panama City, Panama, will sell a wide array of products by Makerbot, an enterprise that specializes in producing desktop 3D printers and the accessories that go along with them.

Anantek, the company behind Makerz, will also help distribute the Makerbot products all across Central America.

Makerbot’s most popular products include the MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer, a printer for the home that has the capacity to turn any amateur designer into a professional 3D printer. Makerbot makes a large range of products including a Digitizer, making it possible for anyone to scan objects and replicate them on a 3D printer. This wide range of products is a solid addition to Makerz, a 3D printing store located in Panama City that allows people to create anything they imagine, or almost anything. It’s also a “3d-printing center”, meaning that designers can print prototypes of their designs at relatively low costs.

Makerz, the logo

Makerz, the logo

In the press release detailing the deal between Makerbot and Anantek, Ariel Yahni, CEO of Anantek, is quoted saying the following: “We see 3D printing as leading the Next Industrial Revolution and think that working with MakerBot will help further innovation and making throughout Central America.”

Other Makerbot products include the Makerbot Replicator Mini, a low-cost 3D printer for the home. When Makerbot launched this product at CES 2014, MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis associated the excitement of 3D printing to the excitement that the first iPhone gave to tech enthusiasts, and that the Makerbot Replicator Mini aimed to recreate that excitement.

With the help of Makerz, Makerbot will also sell many different accessories in Central America. Some of these accessories include a variety of colors of filament. Makerbot has PLA, flexible, ABS and dissolvable filament available for their printers. These different forms of filament can be used in Makerbot printers, however some are not compatible with all printers. The dissolvable filament completely dissolves in a limonene bath. The flexible filament can be completely reshaped by hand using the heat of hot water. This flexible filament becomes translucent when heated and indicates that the filament can be reshaped at will.

A spool of flexible filament

A spool of flexible filament

Makerbot is also praised for its very active and collaborative community. Buyers of Makerbot 3D printers help each other within user groups, but also share their designs with each other on a platform called “Thingiverse”.

At the moment, neither Thingiverse or the various user groups have Spanish versions. Let us know your opinion of Makerbot’s expansion into Central America in the Makerz/Makerbot forum thread at 3DPB.com.

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