Exone end to end binder jetting service

Daisy Fit Forms Uses 3D Printing to Transform Prostheses for Breast Cancer Survivors — Asks Kickstarter for Help

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

Share this Article

Lorne_in_Shop.original

Lorne Gagnon, founder, Daisy Fit Forms

Breast cancer is the most common cancer found in women—across the board—with over 220,000 women being diagnosed each year (according to the CDC ). With those numbers piling up year after year, that leads to a great number of mastectomies being performed, whether single or double, yearly.

One would think the prostheses business for breasts would be booming after all this time, with choices and technology abounding. What a shock to find that there are only four types of prostheses being made for breasts, with only four styles. The Daisy Fit Forms company, upon discovering this—and the technology of 3D printing–has set out to make a change. The team is well-aware that there is enormous demand for the product which they know they can produce in a quality, affordable manner—hoping to make breast cancer survivor’s lives just that much easier.

d3

Hoping to serve just some of the many hundreds of thousands of women who have been affected by breast cancer and mastectomies by offering them new 3D printed prostheses designed specifically for them, and created through a one-on-one basis, Daisy Fit Forms has turned to Kickstarter to launch their product and gain recognition for a very necessary product. The team hopes d1to raise $45K by May 2nd.

With the Daisy Fit Forms prostheses, women are offered not only unmatched, expertly designed and fitted prostheses, but are treated with sensitivity regarding unique concerns, symmetry, etc.

Obviously four sizes cannot fit all. Answering an outpouring of requests from women who want to feel beautiful and complete again, not only after struggling with breast cancer, but also mastectomies, Daisy Fit Forms offers an affordable way for women to have access to a broader array of choices that offer symmetry, balance, and comfort.

What makes an enormous difference with Daisy Fit is the customization and affordability made possible with 3D printing. Even better, and more convenient too, is that women are able to get the process going privately with the use of a mobile or web-based app that the Daisy Fit Forms team created for free downloading. The app allows the user to take a picture of her breast(s) that require the prosthesis and then upload it for 3D printing.

Each prosthetic is:photo-original

  • Made from a 3D printed mold which is then hand-crafted in lightweight form
  • Constructed from medically approved materials
  • Waterproof
  • Custom-molded for individual shape and size
  • Realistic and comfortable
  • Encased in either white, beige, or black soft, durable fabric
  • Affordable

Daisy Fit Forms was founded by designer Lorne Gagnon, a certified mastectomy fitter who for 25 years has been in the business of fitting women who’ve endured mastectomies. He designs custom-fitted swimwear, bras, tops, and dresses.

With the Kickstarter funds, the company would be able to implement manufacturing of their completed prosthetic prototype, improve plans for customer service, create a bigger online presence, and do more for their customers overall. With a pledge of $250, supporters receive recognition plaques, as do all the supporters at or past that amount. At the $500 level, supporters also receive two custom prostheses. As the pledge amounts go up from there, supporters are offered more prostheses, as well as wholesale price coupons for friends.

Headquartered in West Palm Beach Florida, the company will be opening their online services to the public in May.

Have you, or do you know someone who has been affected by breast cancer? Is this a Kickstarter campaign you plan to support? Tell us about it in the Daisy Fit Forms 3D Printed Prostheses forum over at 3DPB.com.  Check out the Kickstarter pitch video below:

https://d2pq0u4uni88oo.cloudfront.net/projects/1744385/video-519938-h264_base.mp4

Share this Article


Recent News

$51M to Ramp up 6K’s Production of Batteries and 3D Printing Metals

Secret Audit Reveals US Military’s 3D Printing Tech Vulnerable to Cyberattacks



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs, September 9, 2021: Events, Materials, & More

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, the first Formnext + PM South China finally opens this week. In materials news, a biomedical company introduced what it calls the first purified...

Featured

US Navy Issues $20M to Stratasys to Purchase Large-Format 3D Printers

The U.S. Navy has been steadily increasing its investment into practical 3D printer usage, as opposed to research. The latest comes in the form of a whopping $20 million contract...

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: August 22, 2021

From food 3D printing and GE Additive’s Arcam EBM Spectra L 3D printer to 3D printing and CAD in a post-pandemic world and topology optimization, we’ve got a busy week...

Featured

The Largest 3D Printed Structure in North America: a Military Barracks in Texas

ICON’s latest 3D printed training barracks structure in Texas signals another positive step for the additive construction industry. Described by the company as the largest 3D printed structure in North...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.