logoThe term arthroscopy means, quite literally from the Greek translation, to look within the joint. With this being the goal for surgeons throughout the years specializing in the field of operating on both hips and knees, they have great new perspective — and tools — today, by way of 3D printing. With this new technology, surgeons are offered much more detailed ways to both diagnose and train. Ultimately this means better surgeons worldwide — and better outcomes — due to the wide array of contemporary 3D printing innovations offered.

one3D Systems has been, and remains, at the forefront of integrating 3D printing into the medical world and allowing surgeons to better investigate, diagnose, and treat joint issues. Before anything else though, 3DS realizes that education and training are most necessary to provide a superior foundation for surgical procedures, as well as cementing the relationship between surgeon and patient needs.

3ds-simbionix-arthro-mentor-webWith their Simbionix ARTHRO Mentor arthroscopic training simulator, surgeons are not only able to receive better training, but it’s more efficient, takes less time, and has a user-friendly platform — all adding up to reduce the learning curve for even complex tasks. Offering detailed, color virtual reality systems, the truly solid didactic forces within the training program are provided by:

  • 3D printed models
  • 3D images
  • Haptic sensation, offering the most realistic way to train, with sensation

With the opportunity to practice with something both virtual and highly realistic — including an arthroscopic camera — surgeons are able to have the education and confidence they need to go into complex procedures. That extra confidence on the medical professionals’ part should offer patients the peace of mind and confidence they most certainly need as they commit to what can often be a frightening prospect at first.

twoRecently, 3DS has announced two new training modules for improving surgical preparedness further:

  • The Hip Diagnostics module
  • The Advanced Knee module

Scheduled to be on display at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in Las Vegas, Nevada, held March 25-27, medical professionals with the greatest stake in refining training and surgical procedures will be able to check out the full line of 3DS offerings “from the training room to the operating room.” This will include the opportunity for those involved in orthopedic medicine to look at 3D printed implants, surgical guides, and medical models, along with these newest training module additions.

“These new modules are part of the latest 3D Systems Healthcare technology, materials and know-how that are designed to power personalized surgery,” said Kevin McAlea, Chief Operating Officer, Healthcare, 3DS. “We are dedicated to helping doctors train for, plan, practice and perform complex medical procedures and achieve better patient outcomes.”

The complexities and seriousness of something like a hip surgery are not lost on anyone, medical professionals or not. With that in mind, 3DS developed the ARTHRO Mentor Hip Diagnostics to offer the most comprehensive training through virtual reality. With a gradual learning mode, medical professionals learn:

  • Anatomical knowledge
  • Visual and probe examination skills
  • Orientation skills
  • Familiarization and comprehensive knowledge of healthy structures in the hip joint
two - hip diagnostics

3D Hip diagnostics

They also become familiar with practicing diagnostics regarding pathological conditions as they are given medical backgrounds for patients, and then:

  • Arthroscopically examine hip joints
  • Capture pathological conditions of the hips and describe them
  • Explore pathologies such as labral tears, chondral injuries, and lesions of the acetabular fossa

With virtual patients being operated on in two positions, supine and lateral decubitus, 3DS states that this is the only VR training available for hip joint procedures.

The new Advanced Knee Module is meant for residents and more advanced surgical trainees, allowing for:

  • Anatomical knowledge of the healthy knee, along with reaching different areas by manipulation of knee
  • Arthroscopically examining the knee
  • Capturing pathological conditions and describing them
  • Exploring pathologies such as meniscal tears, meniscal abnormalities and torn ACLs
  • Training in Meniscectomy Procedures with real-life tears
  • Practicing for knee procedures with tasks like femoral condyle cartilage repair, loose bodies removal and ACL reconstruction.
Knee diagnostics, using VR with 3D images

Knee diagnostics, using VR with 3D images

The 3DS booth, #1238, at the 2015AAOS Annual Meeting will be a comprehensive display of how they are making an impact in the training of surgeons, and directly improving surgical outcomes and procedures. In total, they will be featuring their:

  • 3D printed surgical planning models demonstrating items like models and models of bones and organs, as well as items used for reconstruction
  • Virtual Surgical Planning System, which combines 3DS’ expertise in medical imaging, surgical simulation, and 3D printing for personalized surgeries
  • Simbionix virtual reality simulators and 3D printed anatomical ‘phantoms’ for training
  • Examples of groundbreaking 3D printing technologies for healthcare, to include Direct Metal Printing (DMP) with the ProX200, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) with the ProX 500, and MultiJet printing with the ProJet 

How do yousee this level of virtual reality changing the face of surgical training? How do you think 3D printing will continue to progress and affect the medical sector? Tell us your thoughts in the New Training Modules for Hip and Knee Procedures forum thread over at 3DPB.com. Check out a look at the ARTHRO Mentor modules below.

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