Tribility Core — A 3D Print Server & Group of Apps to Simplify 3D Printing

Share this Article

Developers are putting in a good share of effort lately to simplify the process of 3D printing — and a Swedish company, Tribility AB, has launched a piece of hardware which controls what they call Smart 3D Printing.

They call it “the future of 3D Printing where your 3D printer is connected to the Internet, where you can choose what to print without complex settings and where you can easily design whatever you like without being an expert on 3D programs.”

At the center of the idea is Tribility Core. It might well be called a “print server,” but Tribility say “it’s so much more than that.”

tc3The product is the work of Johan Nordstöm and Johan Blom, and they say that by connecting the Tribility Core module to a 3D printer, the process becomes easy and intuitive to use and the focus of the activity is shifted from configurations, settings, and general complexity.

3d-inventorTribility Core can be operated from an intuitive user interface which allows a user to monitor and control a printer, discover models to print from an online model library, and even design objects using a series of built-in design apps.

The server includes functions like wireless printing, pause, and resume and does away with the need to change settings and tune configurations via a tablet or smartphone.

Nordstöm and Blom say Tribility Core means it’s no longer necessary to use a computer with a 3D printer, and add that it includes the ability to browse a library of 3D models or, if you like, upload and share your own objects.

The device also includes a series of apps: Cube Maker, Tribility Designer, Lithograph Maker, Tribilty 3D Inventor, and Tribility Vase Maker.

Vase Maker is built to let users design bowls, vases, or shot glasses via an editor which can draw the shape of the object’s contour and allows for the selection of the ultimate the roundness of the design.

cube-makerCube Maker is aimed at allowing users to create printable objects by adding cubes one on top of another, and they say the process is similar to how worlds and characters are created in Minecraft, and it allows for designing everything from small figures to advanced objects block by block.

Tribility Designer is billed as “an easy to use, yet powerful CAD software.” It’s a drag and drop interface which features a variety of different shapes to place on a drawing board. The user can then create a 2D drawing and select how tall they wish each each shape to be printed. The designer also includes functions like resize and extrude, and access to each layer means users can models from the simple to the complex as the Tribility software creates a print-ready 3D model.

litograph-makerTribility 3D Inventor makes it easy to design any 3D model by combining different pre-built 3D shapes.

Lithograph Maker lets users easily create 3D versions of photos following a simple upload and choice of frame style. The app then creates 3D replicas of the photo.

At this point, the developers say Tribility Core supports the MakerBot Replicator 2 and the Weistek WT150, but they say this new 3D print server will soon be capable of supporting other 3D printer models as well.

Tribility Core retails for around $240 USD (€220.49), and it can be ordered from Creative Tools.

Would you be interested in a “3D print server” which can take care of most of the details of preparing objects for printing? Let us know in the 3D Print Server forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, July 31, 2021: Student Racing and More

First Lithium Solid State Battery Produced by 3D Printing Startup Sakuu



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Sakuu: Disrupting More than Just Batteries with 3D Printing

To me, Bay Area firm Sakuu is one of the most exciting in the industry. In May, it announced that it would be releasing a 3D printing system for producing...

Featured

Desktop Metal Buys Multi-Material 3D Printing Startup Aerosint

Desktop Metal (NYSE: DM) has bought Aerosint, a firm that has developed a system capable of multi-material metal and polymer 3D printing on sintering systems. Aerosint’s technology can selectively dispense...

Mitsubishi Enters Metal Binder Jetting with Digital Metal Deal

Mitsubishi has been one of the more interesting players in the 3D printing industry as of late, due to their steady growth in the space. Though I’ve been told that...

Battery 3D Printing Firm Considers Publicly Traded U.S. Branch

Blackstone Resources AG (SWX: BLS) has announced that it is exploring the possibility of opening a U.S. branch that would be publicly traded. The firm, which is currently traded on...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.