Designer Creates Working Airsoft Version of Rorsch X1 Rifle from Battlefield 4

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Kirby Downey is a product designer from South Africa who currently lives in London, and he specializes in taking objects and adding a technical and mechanical side to them. He says he first makes them work in a mechanical sense before “adding a story to the product” by using shapes and forms.

951354d447e477f25aa2f84cdabe3202651551edDowney say his work is typified by the props from games he’s modeled, and he adds that he enjoys working with his hands to complete his projects.

“I take special care to ensure that every detail is perfect,” Downey says. “I have a passion for 3D printing and the capabilities it has in today’s world.”

Among his many projects and ideas, an ongoing goal of Downey’s has been to combine working Airsoft pieces, gaming, and 3D printing, and now he’s offering his version of the the Rorsch X1 from the game ‘Battlefield 4’ through MyMiniFactory.

While it’s not Downey’s first 3D printed gun — he’s created takes on weapons from Destiny’s Thorn, Duke, and Thunderlord — it is the first one he says is “entirely functional.”

For those of you unaware, Battlefield 4 was a first-person shooter video game released in 2013, developed by EA Digital Illusions CE (DICE) and published by Electronic Arts. It has gone on to sell over 7 million copies worldwide.  According to Downey, the Rorsch X1 is a Rail Gun from the game Battlefield 4, and he’s taken the design and added Airsoft components to it to create a working Airsoft weapon anyone can use.

He took the components for the gun from the G&G Armaments CM16 Raider. The gun is designed to be easily snapped together with Klik joints designed by Cemal Cetinkaya to make it easy to access the necessary parts if needed.

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The model fits a standard version 2 Airsoft gearbox.  The project print time should be between 7400 and 7500 minutes and it ends up being 119 x 21 x 8.5 cm in size. All parts were printed at 0.2mm layer height and 15% infill except for the lower receiver, which was printed at 75% infill as this component undergoes the most stress.

Will you take on the job of printing this working Airsoft version of the Rorsch X1 from Battlefield 4? Do you have the time and patience it will take to involve yourself in a 7500 minute project? Let us know in the 3D Printed Battlefield 4 Airsoft Gun forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out Downey’s video, below, detailing the process.

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