GP3D’s Root 3D Printer Re-Launched on Kickstarter, Available to Early Birds at $375

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gp34GP3D is back to Kickstarter with the Root 3D printer after a slight hiccup regarding an issue that seems to have been resolved seamlessly, from what we know. With a campaign ending March 25th, they are already cruising along mighty nicely toward their goal of $50K.

With some misinformation that was given to Kickstarter which resulted in lack of communication to GP3D, and their Kickstarter campaign being pulled, GP3D was able to set the story straight and Kickstarter reinstated the launch. Meant to be a 3D printer for everyone, the second time around should be a charm indeed for their Root 3D printer, as at face value it has all the elements many 3D printing enthusiasts are going to be looking for without breaking the bank at all. Being able to afford a 3D printer and indulge in bringing your 3D designs to life with quality sounds quite simply like an awesome deal — especially for novices. Cost- and user-friendliness should be a good draw for families and schools as well.

time lapseFor supporters, the Root is available at the earliest bird price of $375 plus shipping. With a standard retail price of $549, the price is still very affordable with a 3D printer featuring quality, a great design, and a compact desktop model that allows for portability. It’s made to be not only reliable, but extremely durable, with nonstop printing of up to 300 hours and a good track record with no errors or problems with it shutting down during long print times.

With a touch screen, it offers not only contemporary aesthetics, but all the features users expect today, allowing for touch control, set-up, and print management with a full-color 3.5″ screen. The upgraded extruder is able to print down to 100 microns. Made of metal, the Root measures at only 11.7” x 8.7” x 15.9” and although the body is fully metal, they stress its portability compared to other 3D printers.

The build plate is unique in that it moves from side to side and up and down. Consideration to the build plate could turn out to be very interesting because it can be such a challenge with many 3D printers in terms of having to come up with creative options regarding adhesion. GP3D’s goal is to eliminate the need for tape, clips, and glue, as they work with Build Tak. Those improvements are still in the works, but could obviously maximize attractiveness for consumers considering purchasing the 3D printer.

GP3D is an experienced producer of 3D filaments, and as the popularity for their materials increased, they were often questioned as to why they didn’t have a 3D printer for their brand as well — thus, their ongoing development for the GP3D 3D printer ensued over the past year with a diverse team of engineers and designers on their team behind the creation of the Root 3D printer.

rootWith the motto that you can “grow your imagination” with the Root 3D printer, it is meant to be user friendly for kids so that they can have the gift of learning about and experimenting with 3D printing.

Parent company Green Project, Inc. is focused on being as environmentally friendly as their name suggests and is very concerned with recycling of ink jet cartridges and being concerned about landfills overflowing with printing materials. GP3D follows their mission with deep commitment and offers a small footprint with the Root, which accepts PLA filament.

The Root 3D printer is fully developed and all Kickstarter funds will be used to buy materials for production and begin fulfilling orders. Is this a 3D printer you are interested in supporting? What do you think of the metal, compact design? Tell us your thoughts in the GP3D’s Root 3D Printer Re-Launched on Kickstarter forum thread over at 3DPB.com.

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