You Can Now 3D Print Your Own 79 Piece T-Rex Skeleton & Remix it For a Chance to Win Prizes

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t-rex-leftImagine owning your own miniature Tyrannosaurus Rex. Well now you can, thanks in part to MakerBot, and their ever growing Digital Store. Just released earlier today was a complete replica featuring a skeleton of a T-Rex. The replica is identical to the real Tyrannosaurus skeleton found only in textbooks and museums. However, this one is 20 times smaller than the real thing.

MakerBot explains, “From teeth to tail, this model was created in the exact image of the original lizard king. No details were spared, from its intricate skull, to its delicate rib cage, to its laughably small arms.  Whether you’re using it in the classroom or adding it to your collection, you’ll take pride in knowing it’s built accurately to scale.”

The T-Rex skeleton design files can be purchased now in the MakerBot Digital Store for $14.99. It includes 19 separate design files that will print 79 individual pieces. Once t-rex-rearprinted, the fun part begins. You will be able to spend quite a bit of time assembling this dinosaur, in a similar fashion to what paleontologists had to do when they dug up the real bones.

The total print time is over 24 hours, for this magnificent design; by far the most exciting released to the MakerBot Digital Store yet. Once printed, the 79 individual pieces must be put together. There is no glue required, as the pieces all fit together nice and snug.

On top of this, MakerBot has also announced the T-Rex Remix Challenge which launches today and will run through Tuesday, May 13th. They are asking entrants to remix the T-Rex skull. The results should be extremely interesting, and entertaining. Three winners will receive spools of MakerBot filament. More details on this contest can be found on Thingiverse.

Here is a a time lapse video showing the assembly of the T-Rex model, post printing

What do you think? Is this replica of the T-Rex skeleton worth $14.99? Are you entering the “T-Rex Remix Challenge”? We’d love to see your entry in the MakerBot T-Rex thread on 3DPB.com

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