Exone end to end binder jetting service

Sushi Chef Needs Your DNA for Your Personalized 3D Printed Food

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

Share this Article

3D printed food is always a grand source of fascination for readers (and writers). You may have decided to check out this article because you love 3D printing, love sushi, were just hungry—or all three. The triumphs of 3D printing within the food industry, however, surpass gastrointestinal joy as dollar signs flash with profitable promise in an area that could develop by as much as 40 percent annually to evolve into a $500 million industry by 2023.

Robotic arms prepare sushi

Sushi Singularity, a restaurant in Tokyo slated to open this year, is getting in on the customization trend with a “hyper-personalized” menu. And just as 3D printing is often said to be revolutionizing the industrial market, Japan’s Open Meals plans to revolutionize sushi with digital fabrication—and individual DNA studies.

If you are planning to enjoy some of the new sushi ingredients and flavors offered by Open Meals, you will have to provide them with a biological sample at the time you make your reservation. Their team will then research your biometrics so they can give you a “personalized nutrient infusion” – all via sushi!

Guests can look forward to Asian fare that is not only beautifully designed, but also completely customized for their body’s needs. Not just operating on whim, Open Meals has been working on this concept for years.

Undoubtedly, if there is any way to expose people to the wonders of a new technology, it is through their stomachs. The downloadable dishes, meant to offered to the public on the Foodbase platform, will be created with detailed algorithms responsible for producing the proper taste, smell, temperature, and texture. And while 3D printing flesh or organs might not be suitable talk for the dinner table, the Open Meals concept is not unlike bioprinting, using biological information from sushi lovers to then 3D print a meal specific to their own constitution.

One of the greatest benefits—and attractions—to 3D printing is the capability for personalization. In applications like automotive, this may involve the capacity to customize car interiors exactly to the driver’s comfort, or in more retail applications, footwear may be designed completely around the wearer, featuring a one-in-a-kind fit offered via on-demand production.

Even more importantly, as 3D printing continues to weave its way through the medical realm, we realize the incredible potential of patient-specific medical guides as well as 3D printed models for diagnosis and treatment—not to mention the promising future for 3D printed human organs that have little chance of rejection, and don’t have to be provided through an excruciating waitlist.

Curious to find out more about Open Meals? Check out their website, or Wagashi, to learn about their 3D printed fare inspired by nature.

[Source / Images: My Modern Met]

Share this Article


Recent News

$51M to Ramp up 6K’s Production of Batteries and 3D Printing Metals

Secret Audit Reveals US Military’s 3D Printing Tech Vulnerable to Cyberattacks



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs, September 9, 2021: Events, Materials, & More

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, the first Formnext + PM South China finally opens this week. In materials news, a biomedical company introduced what it calls the first purified...

Featured

US Navy Issues $20M to Stratasys to Purchase Large-Format 3D Printers

The U.S. Navy has been steadily increasing its investment into practical 3D printer usage, as opposed to research. The latest comes in the form of a whopping $20 million contract...

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: August 22, 2021

From food 3D printing and GE Additive’s Arcam EBM Spectra L 3D printer to 3D printing and CAD in a post-pandemic world and topology optimization, we’ve got a busy week...

Featured

The Largest 3D Printed Structure in North America: a Military Barracks in Texas

ICON’s latest 3D printed training barracks structure in Texas signals another positive step for the additive construction industry. Described by the company as the largest 3D printed structure in North...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.