Wiesemann 1893 Offers Free Files for 3D Printed Tools and Accessories

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Manuel Siskowski, founder of startup Wiesemann 1893, is reminding us not to forget the serious potential for self-sustainability with 3D printing, and especially when in a pinch; in fact, he believes that, one day soon, users will be fabricating the next tools required for something as basic as IKEA assembly—perhaps an easier task than actually putting together that next eight-drawer dresser with a long list of instructions.

Manuel Siskowski, the founder of Wiesemann 1893 (Image: Gruenderszene)

Promising that his new company offers “the digital tool brand for the Creators of Tomorrow,” Siskowski spun Wiesemann 1893 off of parent company Wiesemann, headquartered in Breckerfeld, Germany, and one of the oldest producers of German hand tools.

Featuring a streamlined website, Wiesemann 1893 offers tools for purchase, to include specialized tools for automotive applications, and screwing, striking, and cutting tools. It also offers free 3D design files for accessories that can be printed by customers themselves. When questioned in a recent interview regarding the actual accessibility and availability of 3D printers for consumers, Siskowski points out that the users typically purchasing tools or files from his website tend to be “tool-friendly,” and more likely to be savvy in terms of digital fabrication.

Siskowski makes it clear that he is a competitive entrepreneur, with no problem “attacking established manufacturers.” The benefits of 3D printing—beginning with affordability—can be extremely alluring to users on any level, but especially industrialists who are always looking at the bottom line.

3D printing wall holder can be downloaded from Wiesemann 1893 or from Thingiverse (Image: Wiesemann 1893)

When it comes to metal printing, Siskowski is realistic about his target audience, as most consumers do not have metal 3D printers in their homes. His intent is to offer standard, functional tool designs for industrial customers at no cost, soaking up the expense through other Wiesemann 1893 tool sales. Only the actual design is guaranteed, and not the actual tool, in case of possible liability.

“In the beginning, we didn’t take it very seriously until a sledgehammer fell off the wall because of problems with the printed holder. Then we have become much more careful and, for example, make appropriate suggestions for critical products,” said Siskowski.

Companies like Wiesemann 1893 are advancing far beyond just talking about the concept of a true industrial revolution. They are making it a reality for smaller industrial companies to participate now too, being given the option of ordering parts as well as printing accessories themselves. While many may rely on such a service indefinitely, it also presents the opportunity to delve further into the technology and begin purchasing their own hardware, software, and learning about suitable materials for their own products.

Currently, two percent of customers are downloading files and 3D printing, while another eight percent are affiliated with third parties who do not order tool accessories from Siskowski:

“That is the reason why we incorporate our logo into our 3D designs,” he explained. “This is how we make it to the wall in the customer’s basement – without having to sell a product.

[Source: Gruenderszene]

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