Three New Large-Format 3D Printers for Aerospace, Automotive, Prosthetics Markets from Modix

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Modix Modular Technologies LTD., headquartered in Tel Aviv, specializes in developing large-format 3D printers…really large. Now, the company is doubling its 3D printer portfolio up to six systems with the release of its latest large-scale models. These three new 3D printers are based on the design of the existing Modix BIG-60 Version 3.0, Modix BIG-120X, and Modix 120Z systems, and are meant to focus specifically on the aerospace, automotive, and prosthetic markets, all of which have a need for reasonably priced, high-quality 3D printers.

“We are proud to continuously develop our line of products and offer an array of solutions to meet our many worldwide customer needs, customers who rely on 3D printing as part of their day to day business,” stated Shachar Gafni, Modix CEO, in a press release. “Despite the COVID-19 crisis, Modix never stopped its services and R&D for a minute and the result is in front of you. The demand for our printers is growing as the recognition for the quality of products and services is spreading. These newly introduced products are only yet another milestone in our road-map to provide an end to end solution within the 3D printing market. Several additional new models at various sizes will be available soon.”

Modix BIG-40

Featuring heavy-duty components, these massive new printers are the 100 kg Modix BIG-40, the 160 kg Modix BIG-Meter, and the 240 kg Modix BIG-180X. Each of these systems comes as a self-assembly kit and includes the company’s standard printer features, such as DUET3D Controller, E3D Print head, Gates belts, HIWIN Motion Rails, IGUS wiring, and more. Modix printers seem to be very reliable, featuring elements including stall detection, automatic bed leveling based on 100 probing points, a filament run-out sensor, and a “resume” function in case the power goes out unexpectedly.

“Modix is extending its offering and providing better solutions for several new vertical niches,” Modix CCO John Van El said. “This effort will help our reselling partners to win more deals than before. Modix’s reseller network is constantly growing.”

Modix BIG-Meter

The Modix BIG-40 3D printer, with a 400 x 400 x 800 mm print volume, looks to be a great choice for the prosthetic market, as it can easily print tall, narrow objects. The 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 mm print volume of the Modix BIG-Meter makes it the second largest of the company’s three new printers, with the Modix BIG-180X coming in with a 1,800 x 1,000 x 600 mm print volume. You might notice that this last large-scale system is extra-wide, and the company explained that this design feature was “per request of customers from the automotive industry.”

The new Modix 3D printers have the same advanced features as the company’s Modix BIG-60 version 3, which include:

  • advanced dual E3D Aero extruders
  • closed enclosure made of aluminum composite
  • dual high flow E3D Volcano hotends
  • leveling casters
  • WiFi and Internet access
  • 32-bit controller
  • 7″ touchscreen

Customers can also request a few add-ons when ordering these systems, such as an air filter device, E3D V6 detailed, E3D-Volcano High flow, and E3D Super-Volcano for super high flow rates, and a high-temperature hotend.

Modix BIG-180X

The Modix BIG-40 is priced at $4,500, while the Modix BIG-meter has an introductory price of $10,500. The largest of the three new printers, the Modix BIG-180x, will set you back $12,000.

(Images provided by Modix)

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