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Mix-a-Monster Challenge Winners Announced: 3 New 3D Printed Hybrid Animal Designs Win i.materialise Contest

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They’ve hatched!  The Mix-a-Monster creatures, hybrids of animals, crossbreeds that existed only in the imagination… They’ve hatched, thanks to 3D printing technology and people’s unlimited imaginations.

Three winners from i.materialise‘s Mix-a-Monster Challenge have been announced, and the designs have been 3D mix-a-monster-challenge1printed. The challenge ran from September 3rd through October 29th, asking participants to “Release the monster inside you!” using Autodesk Meshmixer. And now the results are in,and the three winners’ designs are out.

The winners each received their designs 3D printed using i.materialise’s Multicolor Gloss material, as well as a one-year membership for Autodesk 123D Premium. Additionally, all entrants received a 10% discount to print their designs via i.materialise.

The jury included the i.materialise team and Jesse Harrington Au, Maker Advocate-Autodesk Inc. From among a gallery of entries including a cowlion (or lioncow), a sea cow (dolphin/cow), and a pandenquin (panda/penguin), the three winners emerged.

Presenting the winners:

UniRabbit by Harry Carbonnelle

UniRabbit by Harry Carbonnelle

BunnyBeetle by Tim Nguyen

BunnyBeetle by Tim Nguyen

Pigeal by JC

Pigeal by JC

UniRabbit, BunnyBeetle, and Pigeal represent the three winning entries in the Mix-a-Monster Challenge, and I have to admit I’m pretty happy I won’t meet these little mixed up monsters on the street. One of the best things about 3D printing is that it truly posts no limits to the imagination, and can really bring works purely from the mind into the third dimension.

The contest’s parameters specified that the final creatures had to be able to be printed using Mulitcolor Gloss, and so had to adhere to the material’s design guide for use. Furthermore, it had to fit within a maximum volume of 250 cm³ with a total model volume of less than 60 cm³.  Meshmixer has Analysis tools to check the dimensions.

The “Stability” tool could be used to check both the model volume and the viability of the model to stand on its own (the stability of its base). Meshmixer could also be used to hollow out the models so they’d fit within the specified design — a technique which also can save money on 3D printing costs, as less material is used. The “Inspector” tool was the last one that needed to be checked, to ensure that it was a watertight solid.

unirabbit_hc

UniRabbit’s rendering

What do you think about these winning designs? Did you enter? What was your hybrid? Let us know over at the Mix-a-Monster forum thread at 3DPB.com.

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