Additive Manufacturing Strategies

BASF Supplies Materials for Cincinnati Inc’s SAAM HT 3D Printer

ST Medical Devices

Share this Article

German chemical giant BASF has steadily been saturating the 3D printing industry with its presence. The latest partnership established by the world’s largest chemical company is with machine tool manufacturer Cincinnati Incorporated (CI). The two inked a distribution deal in which CI will supply ABS, carbon fiber PET and recycled PET materials from BASF 3D Printing Solutions (B3DPS) for use with its Small Area Additive Manufacturing (SAAM HT) 3D printer.

The SAAM HT 3D printer from CI. Image courtesy of Cincinnati Incorporated.

The SAAM HT is the high temperature version of CI’s desktop-sized 3D printer, originally developed by Boston startup NVBots in 2016 before CI bought the smaller firm outright in 2017. The machine complements CI’s range of massive pellet-based extrusion 3D printers with a comparably petite prototyping device which is capable of automatically ejecting parts upon completion. The HT version of the SAAM is capable of 3D printing at temperatures of up to 500°C, including ULTEM, PEEK and polycarbonate. Material profiles for each filament the system uses can be downloaded, allowing the printer to process them more quickly and easily.

BASF’s Ultrafuse PET CF15 material. Image courtesy of BASF.

Now, with the BASF partnership, the SAAM HT will be sold alongside Ultrafuse ABS, PET CF15, and rPET. While ABS is nearly ubiquitous in the world of filament extrusion for its strength, flexibility and heat-resistant properties, PET CF15 offers additional strength and thermal resistance. BASF describes the material as being easy to process with low moisture uptake.

rPET is BASF’s gesture towards sustainability. Made up of 100 percent recycled PET, rPET “looks and prints just like virgin material,” according to the company. While BASF maintains a veneer of sustainability through the numerous admirable projects is has established related to renewable energy and biomaterials, it is one of the world’s leading petrochemical manufacturers, explores for and produces oil and gas, has been responsible for dangerous environmental disasters, and develops pesticides and other agricultural chemicals that have potentially toxic effects.

A surfboard from YUYO 3D printed from rPET. Image courtesy of BASF.

While any attempt to introduce sustainability to the world is worthy, it might be difficult to overlook the conglomerate’s larger role in the climate and biodiversity crises we’re currently facing. Of course, any large chemical company in the 3D printing industry will be involved in many of these same ecologically harmful practices, which is why a larger discussion about the role of plastics and 3D printing in a sustainable society needs to be had.

Meanwhile, BASF continues to expand its footprint in the additive space. It has partnered with countless firms in the industry while growing its portfolio of additive materials, including an interesting metal filament for desktop metal 3D printing. Its backing of Materialise and Essentium and acquisition of Sculpteo means that it is only becoming more and more important in additive manufacturing.

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, January 22, 2022: Research, Business, & More

3D Printing Robots Receive €1 Million Boost



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Accelerate to AM Success with Simulation

The benefits of an additive manufacturing (AM) program are highly compelling –for the creation of highly complex parts, economically manufacturing lot sizes of one, and the near elimination of wasted...

2022 Predictions: 3D Printing for Series Production of Metal Parts

It’s time to gaze into the tea leaves and imagine a bright future for 3D printing. In this article, we will be looking specifically at predictions, trends, and developments in...

Featured

BMW Leads Seed Round for Rubber 3D Printing Startup Rapid Liquid Print

Boston 3D printing company Rapid Liquid Print (RLP) is working to make a new class of 3D printers that can effortlessly build large-scale, high-resolution, soft, and stretchable products using industry-grade...

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: December 5, 2021

We’ve got another busy week of webinars and events to tell you about, with topics ranging from aviation and medical 3D printing to a town hall meeting, biomaterials, SLA technology,...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.