Repsol Acquires 17 Percent of Spanish 3D Printing Filament Supplier Recreus

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As it turns out, Recreus and Repsol have a lot in common. And now they will be able to develop their shared interests in propelling industries like medicine further into the future with new technology, along with other critical markets such as textiles, with Repsol acquiring 17 percent of the Spanish 3D printing materials distributor’s company, located in Elda, Spain.

Repsol, headquartered in Madrid, is focused on continually developing new energy prospects, specializing in products and services and materials related to oil, gas, electricity, and chemicals, with the last item coming into play specifically for the 3D printing industry as they have been developing polyolefins as raw material for filament. With an investment fund armed with 85 million euros for the 2016-2020 period, this is one endeavor that will fulfill their goal to move further forward in the technology sector—with a company that complements the products Repsol already provides globally.

Founded in 2013 by Ignacio Garcia as a ‘garage startup,’ Recreus has grown into a worldwide supplier of both elastic and rigid thermoplastic filaments, with a mission to continually develop new materials and new extruders and other required hardware and processes. They are currently very well-known for Filaflex, a line of filaments that they offer in a range of colors and sizes.

With the investment and collaboration on Repsol’s part, Recreus will now be expanding their research and development efforts in materials. The partnership should give them even greater market strength as a supplier, along with supporting their own plans for expansion. Repsol’s resources are vast, as they currently market their products in 90 countries and employ over 25,000 employees. They are also responsible for over 700,000 barrels of oil production per day and are known to have one of the best refining systems in Europe.

“Repsol is also developing modified polymers to be used as raw material in the different 3D printing technologies as part of its innovation and technology programs. 3D printing with elastic materials has many applications in multiple sectors and is rapidly spreading to new fields. Currently, Recreus is working with companies in advanced orthopedics and textiles to develop materials and printing processes specific to their markets,” states their recent press release.

Whether you are a business owner thinking about delving into more progressive technology, a die-hard 3D printing user already, or an enthusiast who enjoys finding out more about scientific innovation, still you may be surprised to find what a role the study and development of materials plays in manufacturing techniques today. Manufacturers are refining plastics, along with as many other materials as there are industries that can put them into use, from metal to concrete to specialized materials like metallic glass.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Recreus]

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