CNH Industrial to Produce Tractor and Bus Parts with 3D Printing

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The opportunities available to industries via 3D printing abound, but rarely do we see a company with so many ways to use the technology all from one source. Headquartered in London & Amsterdam CNH Industrial specializes in capital goods, which as a rule are very different from typical consumer goods. The industrial leader produces many durable long lasting industrial items used to make orr power other manufactured goods or services. Their items contribute to many different processes, impacting over 180 countries. CNH Industrial has just announced that they will be introducing 3D printing into their manufacturing processes, and in fact, have already begun creating their first line of spare parts.

CNH Industrial, employing over 63,000 people in 66 different plants worldwide, will be able to demonstrate—and appreciate—all the benefits of 3D printing on the large scale. The company has revenues of $27 billion and owns brands such as Iveco bus, CASE construction equipment, and the New Holland agricultural machinery. The firm’s Iveco brand alone makes over 150,000 commercial vehicles a year while FPT Powertrain makes over 2.9 million engines a year. For a company with the resources to engage in substantial additive manufacturing practices, they can look forward to ongoing savings on the bottom line in creating parts, whether as replacements or innovations that may not have been possible before without 3D printing. Production speed may increase too, with much less waste and weight. Changes can be made to parts expediently—without the involvement or turnaround time involved in dealing with a third party or lengthy retooling processes.

The firm has many specialized vehicles and vehicle attachments such as this snow clearing tractor made by Steyr

With a supply of 3D printing materials growing alongside growth potential offered by the technology itself, companies like CNH can also produce parts on site and on demand that are often stronger, more reliable, and lighter in weight. 3D printing also lends great benefit to companies like CNH that may be involved in low-volume production of specific components for clients who need them in a hurry. The team can manage inventory of parts better, along with offering greater access and availability, with 3D printing completed within 24 to 36 hours. So far, AM processes at CNH rely on the use of polymers, but they may begin printing in metal soon. The first four parts created by CNH will be used on buses and farm equipment.

“Once printed, each part undergoes stringent testing to ensure it meets CNH Industrial’s requirements and specifications,” states the CNH Industrial team in a recent press release.

“CNH Industrial is committed to further investigating the potential of Additive Manufacturing with the aim of producing a full range of parts and promptly respond to all types of needs at every stage of the product’s lifecycle. 3D printing offers significant sustainability advantages including the optimization of raw materials, energy usage and the overall manufacturing and supply chain.”

One of the main benefits of 3D printing is that it enables the local, on-demand manufacturing of spare parts. This is especially advantageous when only a small quantity of parts are required to satisfy specific urgent orders and also leads to smarter overall management of stock and increased availability.

Unlike traditional subtractive manufacturing, where raw material is removed or cut away, Additive Manufacturing is a precise process which creates less waste and leftover material while at the same time minimizing machine downtime. This, in turn, provides customers with enhanced total cost of ownership (TCO).

Products and services ultimately emerging from the supply chain that begins at CNH Industry mean that people are fed through agricultural efforts, they receive required electric service through the local power supply, and so much more. They offer everything from ‘hauling of the building blocks to building of communities’ through their wide range of businesses engaged in creating powertrain applications, and designing and selling agricultural and construction equipment, along with truck, buses, and other commercial and specialty vehicles.

Iveco Magirus is one of the largest Fire Engine manufacturers in the world.

As 3D printing infiltrates nearly every type of industrial manufacturing, most companies have either purchased 3D printers, outsourced 3D printing, or are considering doing so. Collaborations are popular between a variety of different industry titans, and engineers and designers from nearly every country can find their way as innovators whether in bioprinting, aerospace, architecture, or so much more. Find out more about CNH Industrial and their many industrial divisions here.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

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