Former AutoDesk Team Launches Beta Testing for Intuitive Design Software: UMake

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umake_spinnerIt’s not always easy to communicate new concepts to others, and often it’s challenging just to translate them from brain to paper — or design software. While often our minds get into a rut just trying to think up new ideas, sometimes getting them out and into development is even more difficult. The tools developed to help us with the fluid expression of explaining concepts sometimes reach a rut too. Times change, products evolve, and new teams with new design apps like UMake come along to accentuate and improve on historical design tools like AutoCAD.

CAD software has a very loyal following — and it’s earned. It can be pricey though, and there is a learning curve that could leave the fire for your new concept ebbing — along with the contents of your wallet. If you are in the market for something newer and fresher that is also easier to use, three former designers from Autodesk may have the answer for you with their new product: UMake.

downloadCreated for designers and makers, UMake is a powerful 3D design platform for tablets, which is in beta testing now, and if you check out UMake, you can find more information about becoming a beta tester yourself.

“The purpose of the beta program is to test our user experience and see how can we improve it to enable more people to make 3D designs easily and intuitively on their tablets,” Evi Meyer told 3DPrint.com.

And while there is a revolution going on with designing objects for 3D printing, with a multitude of different software choices to choose from, the UMake team decided it was time to take things to another level — and they’ve got the experience to do it, with three designers who previously worked on Autodesk’s AutoCAD mobile software.

Team members Evi Meyer, Erik Sapir, and Chen Kazaz are working toward a revolution in design software, and if you watch the video below, their work so far is indeed impressive. In seeking simplicity, the user is taken to a higher, more efficient level for expressing their concept — through touch. With UMake, you can sketch right in the application, rather than fumbling with a mouse and cursor.

The UMake team has a vision for the future, and for present and future 3D designers and makers. They realize that with each new technology comes further evolution, and while there’s not the necessity to create new design software from scratch, there is the need to empower designers with greater ease and intuitiveness.

With the possibilities being explored around the world with technologies such as virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and motion sensing, there is much more that the designers and makers have to look forward to in allowing their concepts to come to life. UMake should inspire many to go ahead with designs they may have previously left collecting dust due to lack of affordability and time to learn an intimidating new program.UMAKE

What are your thoughts, after watching the UMake video? Would you like to sign up as a beta tester, or are you ready to try something new with 3D design software? Share your thoughts with us in the UMake Enters Beta Testing Forum thread at 3DPB.com.

 

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