BMW Impresses with 3D Printed Roof Bracket for BMW i8 Roadster

Share this Article

BMW has been using 3D printing for more than 25 years, so the automotive manufacturer has built up a high level of expertise over the decades. Recently, the company has leveraged 3D printing to create some interesting concept cars, but BMW uses 3D printing for more than just creative concepts – it’s putting the technology to work in real-world applications. In fact, BMW is leading the way in the use of 3D printing for mass production in the automotive industry by creating the first metal 3D printed part to be successfully produced for a road car.

The part is a roof bracket for the 2018 BMW i8 Roadster, and it had been in the works for 10 years, until 3D printing advanced to the point at which it could begin producing the part in mass quantities, though relatively small ones. The bracket makes the soft top of the automobile quickly raise and lower and fold and unfold in a zigzag configuration. It wasn’t an easy part to design. It needed to lift, push and pull the weight of the roof, and its design was necessarily complex, making it impossible to cast.

BMW’s designers and engineers used topology optimization software to input specifications like the space they had available and the weight of the load they needed to move, and the software generated a load path, which is a design that distributes the load to minimize the amount of material required in the part. Frequently, the load path is too complicated to be translated into a physical object, even through 3D printing. Complex designs require additional supports, which take up additional space and add extra steps to the production process, making it too lengthy and costly.

The BMW part, which was designed by Maximilian Meixlsperger, Head of Metal Additive Manufacturing at the company, overcame these challenges.

“What BMW did is get this done without support,” said Richard Yen, Altair Senior Vice President for Global Automotive and Industry. “Now they can print one batch at a time for mass production, They can print more than 600 of these brackets in one batch.”

Yen was one of the judges at the recent Altair Enlighten Awards, which honor advancements in lightweighting technology. BMW’s 3D printed roof bracket earned a lot of attention at the awards ceremony for its innovative design, which is 44% lighter than the roof bracket conventionally manufactured for the previous Roadster model.

“When the judges looked at this part, we said, ‘this is the tip of the iceberg for manufacturing,'” said Yen.

BMW was not the biggest winner of the evening – that was GM, which took top awards for reducing the weight of its 2019 Chevy Silverado by 9%, 450 lbs. lighter than the 2018 model of the vehicle. The company achieved this through thinner and stronger new steels, mysterious new assembly processes, and computer simulation. While GM may have taken the top awards, however, BMW got plenty of attention for its roof bracket, which heralds a new era of mass production through metal additive manufacturing.

Lightweighting is obviously a major goal for the entire automotive industry, as lighter-weight vehicles use less fuel and are thus more efficient in cost as well as more eco-friendly. Additive manufacturing is being used by many in the industry to deliver more lightweight parts, and although BMW’s roof bracket is a small part of a much larger machine, its impact on the product as a whole is a big one.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Source: Industry Week/Images: BMW]

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: July 14, 2024

3D Printing News Briefs, July 13, 2024: Metal 3D Printer, AFWERX Award, & More



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing Markets Grows 8% Year over Year

Despite a market slowdown in 2023, the additive manufacturing (AM) sector continues to grow at a robust rate, according to AM Research. The market analysis firm published its Q1 2024...

BigRep Continues Focus on Automation in 3D Printing with Industrial VIIO 250 3D Printer

BigRep has been upping its use of automation lately, first with the launch of the automated, high-temperature 3D printers ALTRA 280 and IPSO 105, originating from the company’s acquisition of...

3D Printing Is Key to the New Energy Space

While it’s difficult to observe from the standpoint of a subjective individual, human society is currently undergoing a fundamental transformation. Driven primarily by resource depletion and lack of deeper economic...

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: July 7, 2024

Things are picking back up again in terms of 3D printing webinars and events! The Experience Stratasys tour makes a few stops this week, as Creat3D and Markforged wrap up...