Canadian Government Invests in Adaptiiv and Its 3D Printed, Patient-Specific Boluses

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To make sure that cancer patients are getting the full strength of their radiation treatment directed exactly where it is most needed, a device called a bolus can be used to “shape” the treatment to the specifics of the person’s body. These devices are traditionally made out of a rubbery material, but can now be 3D printed to improve cancer treatments. 3D radiation therapy platform Adaptiiv Medical Technologies, a startup formerly known as 3D Bolus, is on a mission to improve patient outcomes in radiotherapy worldwide, by using personalized 3D printed medical devices, like the bolus.

Chest wall bolus. [Image: Dalhousie University]

Traditional boluses are put on top of a patient’s skin in order to increase the radiation dose to the skin and to the tissues below it. Unfortunately, they can’t accommodate or correct for anatomical irregularities, and air cavities between the bolus and skin can cause an under dose of medication.

Adaptiiv, with software solutions that integrate with existing treatment methods, utilizes 3D printing to produce on-demand treatment accessories, such as boluses. Its algorithms calculate a customized design automatically, which can change the device’s surface shape so dose distribution can be properly tailored.

Now the Government of Canada is supporting the startup’s work with 3D printed boluses.

“Adaptiiv’s software enables clinicians to design and 3D print accessories for radiation therapy treatment,” said Peter Hickey, the CEO of Adaptiiv Medical Technologies. “Our goal is to democratize the delivery of patient-specific treatment. To that end, Adaptiiv is thrilled with the support it has received from the Canadian Government and Atlantic provinces and their continued role in encouraging innovation as we work to provide our patient-specific solution to the global radiotherapy market.”

Patient-specific boluses are designed for better fit, to reduce air gaps, and also improve patient experience. Patient-specific modulated boluses for electron therapy are designed to provide optimal dose distribution and protect healthy tissue. [Image: Government of Canada]

The Canadian government knows that by assisting Atlantic Canadian businesses on their way to success through commercializing research can result in well-paying jobs for the country. So it’s investing in Adaptiiv’s ideas for 3D printed patient-specific boluses, which can better the delivery of accurate, effective radiation doses to targeted areas.

“For businesses to grow and create good, well-paying jobs, they must be supported in their endeavors to turn their new ideas into products that can compete in the global marketplace,” said Andy Fillmore, Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of Democratic Institutions and Member of Parliament for Halifax. “Adaptiiv Medical Technologies is well-placed to help countless individuals with its technologies that can improve medical treatments, providing a strong foundation on which to build new partnerships with both clients and consumers.”

On behalf of The Honorable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Fillmore announced a $328,943 investment in Adaptiiv, which will be used to help the startup expand its reach and to work toward the regulatory approval it needs to expand to new markets in the US.

“Canada is a country of innovators. Curiosity, courage, and creativity are what lead to the kind of innovations and technologies that improve our daily lives and drive our economy, and our country, forward,” said The Honorable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. “Adaptiiv Medical Technologies, a pioneer in medical solutions to deliver better, more accurate treatment, is an example of the adaptability we need to foster in our home-grown businesses to maintain our competitive edge in the global economy.”

The financial contribution was made through the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), and specifically its Business Development Program; Bains is also responsible for this agency. The program supports the innovations of both small and medium-sized companies as they work to increase competitiveness in export markets.

This investment, which builds upon the commitments made by the Canadian government and the four Atlantic Provinces to drive economic growth through the Atlantic Growth Strategy, will also help Adaptiiv execute a targeted marketing plan, which will feature a demonstration video that showcases its software and promotional materials.

[Image: Adaptiiv]

Additionally, Adaptiiv will use the funds to finish commercializing its High Dynamic Range (HDR) Imaging-Surface Bracytherapy Module. In this treatment, which is most often used to treat breast, cervical, prostate, and skin cancer, sealed radiation is placed inside, or next to, the area which requires the treatment.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

[Source: Government of Canada]

 

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