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Kim Kardashian Lookalike Immortalized in Partly 3D Printed Cake

ST Medical Devices

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[Image: Ferrari Press via Daily Mail]

I have made no secret of the fact that I find edible reproductions of people’s faces to be extraordinarily creepy. I do not want people on my cake. Therefore, in my opinion, the cake that broke the Internet (it didn’t, mine’s still working) is the stuff of nightmares. A baker based in London and Los Angeles recently make a gigantic, partially 3D printed, full-body replica of a Kim Kardashian lookalike out of Rice Krispies and fondant for said lookalike’s birthday, and it’s impressive. My food-portrait phobia aside, it’s really quite a work of art that Debbie Wingham created, and it looks just like Kardashian – although it’s not her. I mean, obviously it’s not her, it’s cake. But it’s modeled not on Kardashian herself, but on her doppelgänger, who must bear an impressive resemblance.

The doppelcäker took Wingham 10 days to make. Rice Krispies and melted marshmallows, aka a massive Rice Krispies treat, made up the base of the sculpture, which was then covered in fondant. Modeling chocolate, which Wingham 3D printed with a food printer, was used to create fine details like facial features. The cakealike even has eyelashes, which were made from sugar, and fingernails, which were also cast in sugar and painted with metallic edible paint.

Kim Cakedashian (or Kim lookalike, but we’ll just call her Kim Cakedashian for now) is edible but not for eating, as I understand it, which gives me some sense of relief as eating cake-people is horrifying. That’s why she’s made from Rice Krispies and not real cake. She’s also wearing a boatload of diamonds, just like Real Kim. $1.6 million worth of diamonds, to be exact. (Those are not edible.) Draped around her neck is a Cartier diamond necklace, consisting of 862 brilliant-cut diamonds totaling 19.8 carats, along with emeralds and onyx stones, and she also wears a six-carat diamond and emerald bracelet.

Wingham was approached by the partner of the Kim lookalike after he saw another life-sized cake she had made, and she agreed to make a cake for his partner’s birthday. She didn’t know at first, however, that she would be making a replica of Kim K’s long-lost twin. She was understandably baffled when she received the photographs of her model.

“At first Debbie thought the client had made an error when she received the images as she thought he’d sent several pictures of Kim Kardashian for outfit reference,” said a spokeswoman for Wingham. “He had told her that his partner loves Kim’s style and she was planning on wearing a look to her birthday party that Kim had worn recently. That was the outfit Debbie was to use as inspiration for the edible installation. On closer inspection Debbie realized that in fact one picture was Kim but the other was someone who looked like her double. She was a bit taller but her features and curves were almost identical especially at first glance.”

It would have been easy to just make a replica of Kardashian, but Wingham took care to make sure that the facial features were those of the lookalike and not Kardashian herself. She found a 3D printable model of Kardashian’s face online and printed it with her food printer, then used modeling chocolate to carefully alter the features so that they resembled her actual client.

Kim Cakedashian by the numbers: she’s made from 85 boxes of Rice Krispies, 15 kilos, or about 33 pounds, of fondant, 13 pounds of modeling chocolate and over 30,000 miniature marshmallows. Edible color dust was used to create a realistic skin tone.

Wingham also made the birthday girl a real cake, presumably one that looked like a cake, to go with her doppelcäker. Although most of Kim Cakedashian was sculpted by hand, 3D printing played an instrumental role in making the facial features as realistic as they are.

Cake may be timeless, but even it hasn’t remained unaltered by technology – 3D tech is, after all, why the Queen’s wedding cake still exists in some form. 3D printing can be used for good or evil, and I tend to be of the opinion that recreating one’s face in food falls into the evil category, but it’s still hard not to be impressed by the level of detail and realism the technology can create.

Wingham so enjoyed building Kim Cakedashian that she says she would love to create actual cake replicas of the entire Kardashian-Jenner family, perhaps for a future episode of Keeping up with the Kardashians. I’d watch that episode. And probably have nightmares, but I’d watch it.

Would you eat a cake replica of yourself? Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Source: Daily Mail / Images: Debbie WIngham via Instagram]

 

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