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There’s a lot going on in the 3D printing world, especially when it comes to business news, and we do our best to keep you informed of the various goings-on in the industry. HP unveiled its groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology to the world in the spring of 2016, and we’ve watched as more and more companies have added the technology to their workflows and distribution portfolios. Now, FDM Digital Solutions, one of the top additive manufacturing companies in the UK, announced that it, too, has invested in HP’s revolutionary MJF technology.

“As the go-to additive manufacturing specialists with the largest production capacity in the UK, we’ve always led the way when it comes to investing in future state of- the-art technology to help our customers reduce lead times and costs, increase speed to market whilst adding design value to the products being produced thereby increasing their profitability margins for the long term,” said FDM Digital’s Technical Director Graeme Bond.

“We’re really excited about our investment in this printer. This new technology combined with our in-house Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) training with time served engineering and laser scanning expertise, will help us deliver great results for all our existing and new customers – it’s going to be a real game changer during 2018!”

[Image: FDM Digital]

Because HP’s MJF 3D printers are up to 10 times faster and less expensive to run, with the ability to fabricate hundreds of parts in a set build time, it’s changing the way end-use components and low-volume parts are manufactured. The technology’s design potential can benefit any company that designs and produces parts, and according to Burnley-based FDM Digital, its new MJF 3D printer is “the only one in the UK commercially available specifically targeting the aerospace, automotive, F1 and consumer packaging sectors.”

MJF technology has high-speed repeat build function and cloud connectivity, low waste, and is very cost-effective, given its volumetric build envelope advantage over other 3D printers on the market. There are already automotive manufacturers using HP’s groundbreaking technology, and forecasters are predicting that by 2019, there will be cars hitting the road with parts 3D printed on an HP MJF 3D printer.

Moving on in today’s 3D printing business news, we’re learning more about a production partnership between UK-based rapid prototyping service provider Paragon Rapid Technologies and Carbon that was first mentioned in September.

“We are very excited to welcome Paragon as our first production partner in the UK. By combining the Paragon team’s extensive manufacturing experience, with Carbon’s innovative technology, we’re able to provide a full production solution to their customers,” said Dana McCallum, Head of Production Partners at Carbon.

Paragon, which is growing steadily into one of the UK’s premier local 3D printing specialists, is the first production partner for Carbon in the UK, and the partnership reflects its continued commitment to 3D printing innovation. After successfully launching Carbon’s breakthrough CLIP process at the TCT Show this fall, Paragon is now introducing the company’s proprietary Digital Light Synthesis (DLS) technology to the UK market for the first time.

Carbon3D Lab [Image: Paragon]

Carbon’s DLS technology is a perfect addition to Paragon’s expanding 3D printing facility, having increased its AM capabilities so it can now supply end-use parts in a variety of engineering-grade materials.

Paragon Rapid Technologies is the first UK production partner for Carbon [Image: Paragon]

“The market place has been waiting for a leading additive manufacturing solution to push the boundaries of what is possible which combines engineered materials, speed efficiency and build definition, and we feel the Carbon technology does just that. DLS is game changing for the industry, because our customers can go from design to production with one technology, which significantly reduces development costs and eliminates tooling requirements,” said Phil Adamson, Managing Director at Paragon. “Alongside an ambitious materials program, it gives real scalability for higher volume batch production.”

DLS technology differs from conventional 3D printing systems in that it uses light and oxygen to manage a liquid gradient in order to 3D print robust parts, which have surface finish and mechanical properties similar to what you’d find in injection-molded plastic parts.

Hundreds, and even thousands, of production parts can be rapidly manufactured using Carbon’s DLS technology, without the need for tooling at the end, and applications include automotive components, mobile protection products, safety device enclosures, surgical instruments for orthopedics, and shoes.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts; join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

 

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