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South African Designer Completes 365 Days of 3D Printing for 2017

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The designer, modeling the 3D print from Day 4, 2017.

While New Year’s resolutions abound each year, success stories do not. So, when Tom Van Den Bon announced his very unique intention for 2017 to 3D print something every day, we began following with avid interest. And obviously, since we are taking time to publish another piece about his ongoing work, he met his goal of making 365 3D printed objects. When we checked in last May, Van den Bon was on target and forging ahead persistently, making a variety of prints he might not have taken time out for otherwise in his creative life.

Fast forward to 2018, and Van den Bon now has a vast collection of items he 3D printed over the last year. Some days he was busy printing parts for larger more intense works, ranging from a LEGO robot to a full-size, functional go-cart.

Check out the picture above of the engine he 3D printed, as well as the entire gallery documenting Van Den Bon’s work over the year. You’ll see everything from Star Wars and Disney characters to more LEGO-style creations, household accoutrements, enviable beer bottle stoppers, slinkies, chess pieces, and more.

He also worked with 13 other designers last Christmas to create a modernized Advent calendar. Not just for looking at, the 3D printable Christmas tree calendar was completely interactive, with new toys being released for 3D printing each day—taking the exercise to a much higher level than just opening a little paper window and peering in at a picture (and for most of us, that has been exciting enough over the years!). Those who kept up with the project and printed each of the toys had a fully assembled tree and calendar at the end, resulting in quite the 3D printed collectible.

Around 51 kilograms of filament was used for the project overall– which would translate to almost ten miles’ worth of material!

Sponsors included:

And you’ll probably be glad to hear—as we were—that just because Tom’s 3D printing frenzy and hoopla of 2017 is over doesn’t mean this amazing designer will be done with 3D printing projects. He plans to pursue his YouTube channel, while continuing to create a bevy of new 3D prints that electronics hobbyists should find interest in as he dabbles with the Raspberry Pi and Arduino. This is a logical progression for any designer, as so many functional and incredibly creative and affordable projects can be 3D printed with the inclusion of the mini-computer and smart electronics.

 

Find out more about Van den Bon and his work last year in a 2017 television interview in the video posted below, as well as checking out his YouTube channel, ‘Tom’s Workshop,’ that should offer lots of great information for 2018.

Discuss this article and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Source: Makers.htxt.Africa; Images: Tom Van den Bon]

 

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