Careers in 3D Printing

Share this Article

It’s not just a fad. Explore how people are using 3D printers in their careers and why it’s important to teach the next generation about this growing technology.

Dr. Alex Chee shows 3D printed surgical models at Maker Faire NY 2017 [Image via MatterHackers]

When speaking with teachers about their efforts to bring 3D design and 3D printing programs into their K-12 classrooms, the one pervasive question is still – why? Teachers try to get funding from administration and are asked – why do you need a 3D printer? Administration springs funding on teachers earmarked for 3D printers, and teachers ask – why do I need to take time out of my classroom to teach how to use a 3D printer? Teachers introduce 3D printing to their classrooms and the parents ask – why are you wasting my child’s time with some “fad”?

Answer – preparation for future jobs. And current jobs. ALL the jobs. Medicine, video games, architecture, manufacturing, product design, special effects for TV and movies, automotive, entrepreneurial efforts we’ve never even heard of (like desktop 3D printers themselves were in 2011) and more all require some form of 3D modeling skills. And the tool of choice to fabricate those models in reality – prototype or final product – is 3D printing.

Teaching simple 3D modeling software like Tinkercad in schools not only prepares students to broaden the scope of job opportunities they might not have considered before, but the practice of designing something in CAD software also covers core STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) standards that need to be taught anyway.

Engagement is the unique factor here. Teachers need to work especially hard with the current generation to grab their attention and keep them engaged. Brains are changing. There are more tactile learners and kids that have various issues with paying attention than ever before (even if that issue is being distracted by the cell phone in their pocket.) Incorporating 3D design and 3D printing into the lessons teachers need to teach anyway makes the lesson stick and the classroom time more fun.

Read the full article, including examples of vocations you may not have thought about before which require 3D modeling and 3D printing skills — medicine, architecture, manufacturing, product design, special effects for TV and movies, anthropology, automotive, entrepreneurial — at MatterHackers.

Discuss education, careers, and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

 

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, July 13, 2024: Metal 3D Printer, AFWERX Award, & More

3D Printing Markets Grows 8% Year over Year



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Vision Miner Acquires its 3D Printer Supplier AddWise

Vision Miner, a provider of industrial 3D printing solutions, has announced the acquisition of AddWise, a manufacturer of 3D printers and related products, in a deal valued that the companies...

“Auto Repair Needs 3D Printing” – Harold Sears Weighs in on Auto Additive’s Launch

Despite the automotive sector’s long-time adoption of additive manufacturing (AM), the use of the technology for end parts in consumer vehicles is only just now beginning to take off. And,...

Featured

Formlabs Buys Nascent SLS 3D Printer Competitor Micronics

Formlabs, maker of accessible yet professional 3D printers, has acquired Micronics, which recently debuted with a claim of making a $2,999 3D printer. I, for one, was pretty incredulous about...

The Producers: HP’s President of 3D Printing Savi Baveja Explains How the Company is Addressing Scalability

HP (NSYE: HPQ) and the additive manufacturing (AM) industry in the US need each other. In the long run, I believe that what’s good for one will be good for...