NovaCopy Launches 3DU with Courses in 3D Printing

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You would just about have to be living under a rock these days to not have heard at least some whispers about the wonders of 3D printing. There is something almost magical about it and it generally elicits a strong reaction of interest no matter the audience. It is now commonly integrated into STEM education and is steadily working its way into school curricula at earlier and earlier stages.

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This small chess piece was produced in about 30 minutes as an example of the types of elements that Novacopy can produce with their 3-d printers. (Photo: Larry McCormack, / The Tennessean)

But what do you do if you have already finished school, have you simply missed your opportunity to learn about how to operate this technology? After all, you’ve heard about the great democratization of production that this technology allows, but that requires a broad distribution of the knowledge required to participate as well.

In response to the desire by many to learn about how to utilize 3D technology, NovaCopy 3D University, also known as 3DU, will open its doors on October 22 offering classes in 3D printing that will help beginners gain a broad understanding of the technology. The 3-hour class comes with a $299 price tag, but that’s still less than many other educational offerings, and is a great way for self-motivated learners to overcome that initial knowledge hurdle. The president of NovaCopy’s 3D printing division, Melissa Ragsdale, explained the idea behind the initiative:

“There is a tremendous need on the part of the user or buyer to really understand what they’re buying. They are interested in it and they think it’s cool, but they’re a little afraid. They’re not really sure they know how to use the equipment.”

Ragsdale hopes that enrolling in one of the 3 hour courses will help clear away the confusion and fear that first time users face. And, of course, having opportunities to learn about the equipment can be a selling point for the machines as well. This type of market expansion through education is not new, in fact, it’s a model we are quite used to, and it is clearly beneficial for both the company and the consumer.

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The course is not the only educational outreach offered by NovaCopy. Customers get basic software and instructions and can hire NovaCopy to provide basic training. They also offer PowerPoint seminars that people can access from their home or office. The 3DU course is really designed to give people a greater understanding of how to use the machines and therefore is more hands-on.

NovaCopy, headquartered in Nasheville, Tennessee, was founded in 1998 and has been recognized as one of the 500 fastest growing companies in the United States. They are a full service provider in the area of 3D technology, copiers, and other document solutions, currently servicing 15,000 businesses across the United States. In addition to their latest educational outreach, they have been involved in community outreach through a program to provide free copiers to non-profit organizations.

Are you considering taking one of these courses?  Let us know your thoughts in the Novacopy 3D printing course forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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