TwoBears Unveils New Bio-degradable, Renewable Filament, bioFila®

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In just the last month alone we have seen the competition really heat up for the materials market of 3D printing. It often seems that all the new 3D printers emerging on the scene overshadow what is being done in the twobears-2materials world, which is just as, if not more important to the industry as a whole.

Today a company based out of Tewswoos, German, TwoBears, has unveiled their new bio-plastic 3D printer filament line, bioFila®. The new filament is 100% bio-degradable, and made of completely renewable material. The company has released both bioFila® Silk, and bioFila® Linen.

  • bioFila® Silk features a soft, shiny, noble look, and mimics the aspects you would find in silk, hence the name. It requires an extruder temperature of 165 – 200°C / 329-392°F, and hot-bed temperature of 90°C / 194°F. It can print reliably at speeds of 20mm/s.

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  • bioFila® Linen, which has a matte, rough look and feel to it, requires an extruder temperature of 220 – 240°C / 428-464°F, and a hot-bed temperature of 65°C / 149°F.  It also can print at a speed of 20mm/s.

Both materials harden to a further degree than traditional PLA filaments, allowing for several unique applications of use. TwoBears’ stated goal is to provide, affordable, renewable 3d printer filament to the world, and not to skimp on quality for the sake of making a filament bio-friendly. The new filament will be available for sale at their website starting next month.  Discuss the new filament at the bioFila® forum thread.

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