Six 3D Printer Reviews: June Aggregation

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With so many 3D printers available, first-hand experiences via reviews can lead to informed decisions when in the market for a new machine. This aggregation provides a look into some of the most recent reviews of desktop 3D printers available.

Tom’s Guide recently tested more than a dozen 3D printers. The publisher’s top pick “for those on a budget” is the XYZ da Vinci Mini. The Mini includes auto-calibration features, and it creates “good-quality prints.” Individuals looking to print on a variety of materials should consider the LulzBot Mini, which supports the following materials: ABS, nylon, polycarbonate and polystyrene.

The Mankati E180 3D printer boasts a linear rail that is larger than many similar printers, according to a review from 3D Printing Industry. “Initial impressions of the 3D printer are that it is well constructed and aesthetically pleasing. The E180 is well built with a fully enclosed metal frame, linear rails for X & Y axis and large lead screws for Z axis, in the main it is very robustly put together,” the review says. However, it is a necessity to manually change the screw height for the Z home sensor in order to level the bed.

Reviewboard recently reviewed the Fusion3 F400 Industrial 3D Printer. The printer is “a lot bigger” than the average desktop 3D printer, according to the review, with dimensions of 30.6″ x 28.1″ x 25.25.” It has print speeds of up to 250 MM per second and layer resolution as little as 20 microns. The Fusion3 F400 uses Fused Filament Fabrication, also called Fused Deposition Modeling.

TheMaker Select Ultimate 3D printer includes a variety of features such as 20 micron layer resolution, increased build volume, 300 mm per second print speed and anti-jam filament feeder, according to a review from 3DEngr. However, the 3D printer’s cost is rather expensive, at $699.99.

The Flashforge Finder3D printer, an open-frame 3D printer with a single extruder, can only print with polylactic acid filament, according to a review from Latest Gadget Reviews. However, “The Flashforge Finder proved to be a reasonably reliable 3D printer that can produce good-quality 3D prints.” The printer is 34 cm x 34 cm x 34 cm, shaped as a cube.

TechnaBob tested the Overlord ProPlus 3D printer, and, according to its review, it does a quality job printing large, complex models, “and with fewer issues than I’ve had with some other printers.” The printer can create models up to 260mm tall x 170mm in diameter. Its features include ability to work with PLA and ABS filaments, cooling fans, automatic calibration and heated bed.

The front and top of the Stanley Model 1 3D printer open so you can see printing in action, according to a review from GeekDad. This 3D printer does have one significant limitation – users must buy the filament from Stanley. The 3D printer’s dimensions are 16″ wide by 17″ tall and deep. The reason filament must be purchased from Stanley: “The filament for the Model 1 has been developed in a specialized manner with the highest quality materials due to the fact that the extruder has such a finely developed exit point. This allows for extremely high definition prints. Any filament that is not within the specific tolerances of the Model 1 filament formulation can clog the printer.”

We will be aggregating the latest 3D printer reviews every two weeks to keep you informed and up to date with real experiences using 3D printers. Discuss in the 3D Printer Review Aggregate forum at 3DPB.com.

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