Ready, 3D Print, Fire! Antique Rifle Is Recreated on ZMorph 2.0 SX

Inkbit

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The ZMorph 2.0 SX Multitool 3D printer is definitely being put to use around the world. Lately, we’ve seen creations such as the multifunctional walker prototype and the eco-friendly shoe. Now, the team at Get Models Now has 3D printed a replica that is indeed hard to distinguish from the original. The 3D printed rifle will soon be displayed in Poznan, Poland at the National Museum—home to the original rifle also.

The magic begins with at the 3D scanner, allowing for a digital file to be created. Once the data is digitally stored, it can be 3D printed. The intent behind the project is for the replica to serve as a way for museum goers to be able to actually see and feel what such a rifle, circa 16th-century, would be like. This practice is becoming more and more common for museums in terms of presenting and archiving, as they are able to keep originals safe from handling and harm while presenting almost an identical copy to the public.

With such digital files, museums are also able to share copies of many different ancient pieces, and even fossils. Access to such 3D printed replicas allows for greater education, as well as entertainment as pieces such as the rifle become part of the museum’s interactive display.

In creating the replica, the Get Models Now team used a lead rod around which all of the rifle parts were centered. Weighing in at 5.2 kg, the piece measures one and a half meters. There is carving on the barrel and engraving on the trigger, and the team also added ornaments that were hand-painted, as well as painting the rest of it to look like real wood.

The rifle on the bottom is the replica.

“Using a desktop 3D printer, antique restoration specialists can reconstruct almost every museum exhibit, no matter what size it is, while saving a lot of money in comparison to printing them with industrial machines,” states the ZMorph team in its description of the project. “With the right amount of post-production, these 3D printed replicas can be used as movie props, teaching aids, or become part of interactive exhibitions to give people a unique opportunity to literally get in touch with history.”

This is not the first replica the Get Models Now team has made. They also used the ZMorph 2.0 SX to create a 3D print of an antique pistol. Meant to be a ‘stylish prop,’ the 3D printed gun was made with Bronzefill and Woodfill filaments. It took the team approximately 40 hours to print. If you are interested in seeing more of this team’s work, check out another recent print—their 3D printed baroque frame. Discuss in the 3D Printed Rifle forum at 3DPB.com.

[Source/Images: ZMorph]

 

 

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