FirstBuild Wants You to 3D Print The Enclosure For Their Green Bean, Smart Home Maker Module

IMTS

Share this Article

green3Think back 15 years ago, if you are old enough to remember, when the internet was in its infancy and the possibilities endless. The possibilities still may be endless, but the world has changed. The internet, as a technological backbone, has changed our every day lives in ways we never could have imagined in 1999. The companies who were first to embrace the internet are the ones who are leaders in today’s business world.

Here we are, almost a decade and a half removed from that time, and there are two areas in technology which could be just as, if not more promising than that of the internet. One is the ‘Internet of Things,’ promising to connect billions, if not eventually trillions of everyday objects to the net and ultimately one another. The second is 3D printing, which has the capability of transcending the current methods of manufacturing, with an entirely new paradigm of making. There are billions being spent in both these areas, preparing for the next wave of explosive technology progress.

Green Bean module

Green Bean module

One company who is embracing both 3D printing and the Internet of Things is General Electric. Earlier this week, we discussed their FirstBuild microfactory, a platform used to harness the powers of the crowd in order to design, engineer and build the next generation of home appliances.

One of the first products offered by FirstBuild was unveiled this week, called Green Bean. For just $19.95, anyone can purchase this tiny green module, which has the capability to control many of your appliances. With an intermediate level of programming skills, one can essentially hack their normal GE appliances, making them smart appliances. Do you want to be able to control your oven temperature from your tablet or phone? How about check on the wash cycle of your dishwasher from afar? All this is possible and more, with the Green Bean module. The module will come with a software developer kit, and the complete instructions on how to program the device can be found on Github.

Rendering of Green Bean in a 3D Printed Case

Rendering of Green Bean in a 3D Printed Case

General Electric isn’t stopping there though. The green bean module itself, which is basically an unprotected circuit board, should have its own enclosure. Firstbuild does not provide such an enclosure, instead they offer a link to Thingiverse to download a 3D printable case for the Green Bean Module. Of course, you don’t have to print the particular enclosure provided by FirstBuild, as you could always use the basic open source design as a starting point in creating your own.

What this project does, is provide the bare-bones hardware necessary to turn dumb appliances smart, for a price which nearly anyone can afford to pay. It’s up to the consumer to dress up this device, both from a coding sense, and a 3D printing sense. It will be interesting to see what else comes out of the FirstBuild initiative, and how 3D printing will be incorpoarted into the future of GE’s home appliance ecosystem

Let us know if you have purchased a Green Bean module. Feel free to post your opinions, as well as any customized 3D printed enclosures you may create for this device, in the 3D printed Green Bean forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

Polls of the Week: Are 3D Printed Guns a Threat and Should We Regulate Them?

Deloitte Study: US Needs 3.8 Million Manufacturing Workers by 2033, and Half Those Jobs Could Remain Unfilled



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Researchers Gain New Levels of Control over Volumetric 3D Printing

A recent study published in Advanced Materials Technologies by Nathaniel Corrigan, Xichuan Li, Jin Zhang, and Cyrille Boyer delves into the advancements in xolography, a pioneering volumetric 3D printing method....

3D Printing News Briefs, April 3, 2024: Kickstarter FDM 3D Printer, Artificial Eyes, & More

In 3D Printing News Briefs today, we’re talking about an FDM 3D printer on Kickstarter, advancements in artificial eye creation, and 3D printed solenoids for electromagnets. Then we’ll move on...

Stanford Researchers 3D Print Elusive Shapeshifting Structures

Nano 3D printing is a field that continues to make steady progress, but whose applications are still being discovered. One of the most exciting areas where additive manufacturing (AM) at...

3D Printing News Briefs, March 16, 2024: Partnerships, Affordable Bioprinter, & More

We’re starting with dental 3D printing news today, and then moving on to some new partnerships. Then it’s on to some interesting university research about 3D printing plant-based pharmaceuticals, but...