Shapeways Announces Winners of the Spin It To Win It Contest

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sw-logo-colorLet’s face it, 3D modeling can be hard. While there are a plethora of 3D printable models online there may be something you would like to print that just isn’t available. So what do you do if have no 3D modeling experience or have very rudimentary skills? How do you design that cool toy or component that you’ve been dreaming of? And if you don’t have a printer or access to one, how would you get it printed? Well, there are few apps that are available for modeling and very are service bureaus that can print your design. Recently, Shapeways teamed up with Gravity Sketch, a 3D modeling app for iPad and iPad Pro, to host a contest highlighting the possibilities of easy model creation and printing.

Shapeways and Gravity Sketch launched the Spin It To Win It Contest in June. Participants were tasked with using the Gravity Sketch app to create their own spinning top designs. Prizes for the contest consisted of 3D prints of the top 8 designers during the first round of judging — when all 8 were set spinning and streamed on Facebook — and up to $100 in Shapeways printing credit for the top design. The top 8 designers also received the 3D printed versions of their tops. Well, the wait is over and the winners of the challenge have been announced.

tops-contest-email-hero-552x534There were 30 entries in the contest and these aren’t any old ordinary spinning top designs. There were merry-go-round designs and lily pad and cattail designs, and while there were many other unique designs, in the end there could only be 3 winners.

Third place went to Timothy Shay of twoshay’s Gravity Prop Top, winning $25 in Shapeways 3D printing credit. The design is light, fast and stable. you can blow through a straw to spin its propellers and speed the top past its initial spin point. Pretty cool! The Gravity Prop Top can be ordered at twoshay’s Shapeways shop for $7.00.

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twoshay’s Gravity Prop Top

PamC’s Umbrella Top was awarded second place, with a $50 prize in 3D printing credit from Shapeways. It looks pretty much like it sounds, it’s a spinning top that looks like a standard umbrella that spins on its top. It even sports a curved handle. Umbrella top is available for sale on PamC’s shop for $15.00.

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PamC’s Umbrella Top

And finally, first place and $100 in Shapeways 3D printing credit went to Blue Angel Number 6 by Seth Williams of Sethdesigns. It was created to honor fallen Marine Corps Blue Angel Capt. Jess Kuss (#6), who was killed when his Blue Angels jet crashed shortly after takeoff in June. This incredible top is a bi-level design featuring 6 jets that ‘fly’ in formation when spun. The detail and spinning ability blew the judges away. The Blue Angel Number 6 top can be purchased at Sethdesigns’ shop for $12.67.

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Sethdesigns Blue Angel Number 6

All the Spin It To Win It Contest entries can be found here. Congrats to the winners and all the entrants to the contest!

[Source: Shapeways]

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