Rapid

Materialise Goes to the Races, Helping University Students Design and Race a Stylish 3D Printed Car

Inkbit

Share this Article

DSC_2302There are a lot of unusual racing events that take place around the world, but I never would have imagined racing vehicles powered by electric screwdrivers. That is, however, exactly what takes place at the biennial Akkuschrauberrennen cordless screwdriver race on the campus of HAWK Hochschule (HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Arts) in Hildesheim, Germany. It’s like a modernized, university-level version of the classic soapbox derby, which has been turning children into competitive makers and drivers since the 1930s. In the Akkuschrauberrennen, teams of up to six students from area universities must build vehicles that can carry at least one person and can be driven by an electric screwdriver (presumably, sonic screwdrivers are banned); those vehicles are then raced against each other, with this year’s competition taking place on June 25.

DSC_4197_41c0546f8cThe Akkuschrauberrennen has been taking place for nine years, and each iteration of the race has a different twist (of the screwdriver?) or theme for an extra challenge, as well as for practical application of the engineering students’ practical skills. The 2013 race, for example, required that all vehicles be made from paper. This year’s theme was 3D printing: at least 50 cm of the organically, sustainably designed vehicles had to be 3D printed. 11 teams competed in this year’s race, including Team Ostfreezer from the Hochscule Emden/Leer, which had won first place three times already. They took the 3D printing challenge even further than they had to, by creating a vehicle with an entirely 3D printed frame.

As engineering students, the team members were already familiar with digital design and 3D printing, but needed to avail themselves of some professional assistance in terms of obtaining the resources required to actually create their 3D printed car. For help with their design, Team Ostfreezer turned to Materialise, who assisted them in designing the car’s body with Materialise Magics and Materialise 3-matic software. The result was not only sturdy and functional but attractive to look at, with its curving lines and webbing-like textures that, according to Materialise, would not have been possible without 3D printing. Materialise printed the frame out using laser sintering technology and shipped it over to the German students, who glued the various parts together to create their sleek, speedy, screwdriver-powered car.

race16-frontal

Around 5,000 people gathered to watch the Akkuschrauberrennen, which took place on a bright, sunny day in Hildesheim. Each team was given exactly 60 seconds to start up their cars with their electric screwdrivers and then give their teammates a starting push onto the track, which featured several sharp turns and obstacles to challenge the drivers. Alas, Team Ostfreezer did not add a fourth title to their record this year, though they did make the quarter finals. First place was taken by Team MOPET from HAWK Hochscule’s Hildesheim campus, despite an impressive crash in their first race. There’s definitely something to be said for home track advantage. You can watch a few highlights from this year’s race below. Discuss further in the Race Featuring 3D Printed Car Frame forum over at 3DPB.com.

[Source/Images: Materialise]

 

Share this Article


Recent News

5 Ways Biden’s AM Forward Strategy Will Grow 3D Printing in the US

3DPOD Episode 105: Automated Post-Processing with Joseph Crabtree, CEO AM Technologies



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3DPOD Episode 104: Large Format 3D Printing with Caracol CEO Francesco De Stefano

Francesco De Stefano was a consultant before he came to Caracol. You’ll notice that when he answers questions about the market and the future of his firm. He had to...

Injection Molding Firm Oechsler Doubles Down on 3D Printing with HP and AMT Expansion

Oechsler AG is a Germany-based, leading global supplier of polymer solutions that has been operating for over a hundred and fifty years. The company was also an early adopter of...

3DPOD Episode 103: Dental 3D Printing with Ankush Venkatesh, Glidewell Intrapreneur

Ankush Venkatesh passionately tells us about Glidewell Dental‘s holistic and very vertically integrated adoption of 3D printing. The firm has had to make its own software, deploys over 400 3D...

3DPOD Episode 102: 3D Printing Metamaterials with METAFOLD CEO Elissa Ross

Mathematician Elissa Ross is a member of MESH Consultants, which commercializes mathematical solutions for practical industry problems. METAFOLD is a MESH spinout that aims to rid us of our meshes...