Help Wanted: 3D Printing Job Market is Wide Open

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Are you experienced in 3D printing and looking for a job–or a change? If so, your future may be bright in the burgeoning 3D printing and additive manufacturing industry. The consumer market for 3D printers is growing at a staggering rate of 100 percent, and as curiosity and innovation in this area begin to open up, naturally so does the job market. The interesting “problem” right now (ahem!) is that companies are having trouble finding enough people to fill the jobs.

Best Locations for Recruiting 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing Skills

Best Locations for Recruiting 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing Skills

As the industry is continuing to evolve, the job market is wide open for those experienced in 3D printing and additive manufacturing, with job ads that required these skills increasing by 103% just in the last year. Jobs are appearing faster than candidates are being recruited. As young people become more interested and skilled in 3D printing, and as the technology becomes more available in schools and universities, the gap should begin to close over time.

3D printing, materials, and communities are changing the landscape of many industries.

3D printers, materials and communities are without question changing the world. Who wouldn’t aspire to work with some of the biggest names in aerospace, medical device innovation, automotive manufacturing/design, and business? Industry analyses point toward massive growth and enormous numbers for the 3D industry—well into the billions in the next decade. As young people learn about new technology, and are exposed to these new interests in school as well as media, it’s only common sense that they will see that this is a workforce with huge potential for beginning new careers or adding to existing skill sets. Employers need candidates to fill jobs now though.

What degrees typically encompass the required skills or will be required by employers? Engineering jobs are at the top of the list, both industrial and mechanical. Software developers obviously rank at the top as well. Next come industrial and commercial designers. Also on the list? Marketing managers—and we all know, where there is a product, sales and marketing are front and center.

In ads placed for 3D printing and additive manufacturing in the past month, 35% were for engineering jobs. Most industry analysts expect manufacturing to be the area where the most 3D printing jobs will be created, as items can be designed and produced so much more quickly, with less expense. Hiring trends show increased demand for jobs in equipment manufacturing, educational institutions, tire manufacturing, GPS-type systems, and aluminum sheet, plate, and foil manufacturing.

This leaves a wide range of flexibility in the market for up and coming hires, with everyone able to hop on the 3D bus and find a seat for now, as growing needs in this new workforce emerge.

If you’re all about 3D, this is a great time to start job-hunting. Are you looking for employment in the 3D printing field? Please share your thoughts with us in the 3D printing jobs forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing 4-Year Hiring Trends

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing 4-Year Hiring Trends

[Source: WantedAnalytics]

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