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Brit Designer’s 3D Printed Lingerie Banishes Offensive Panty Lines

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VPL

Just say no to the VPL.

While standing in the grocery store line yesterday holding a frosty tub of cookies and cream ice cream for my children, mind you, things were held up at the register for several minutes and I was finally just left staring at the back of the woman in front of me, trying my best to be patient. She was casually sporting an open backed knit blouse, exposed to the waist, and prominently displaying a well-worn bra featuring a zebra print, with even that tiny raggedy little white tag showing by the clasps.

While I have certainly fallen victim to a few epic fashion fails myself over the years, I don’t judge. But today I am still wondering when it became acceptable to walk around displaying one’s everyday, tired brassiere.

Meanwhile, the panty line has not fared in such liberal fashion. You might be able to walk around in the skimpiest bikini possible, and show off bra straps Madonna style all day long, but to allow for a nearly invisible line to show that you actually have a rear end housed in those silky dress pants? Horrors! And the truth is, panty lines really aren’t acceptable anywhere. Why? Because we don’t want the secret to get out that we are wearing, shhhhhhhhh, undergarments.

352053BF00000578-0-image-a-32_1465569141101Jess Haughton, 23, is a fashion student working to save our culture from the shock of both panty and bra lines. In the world according to her garments, you would never know there was anything being worn underneath that dress, business suit—or whatever it is you might choose to head out to the grocery store in. Thanks to 3D printing, Haughton has been able to construct lingerie for the modern day, made out of silicone. It’s not just a perfect fit—it’s a perfect smoothing.

The native of London is attending Nottingham Trent University. There, she’s become not just a bit of genius at keeping folks from committing the crime of putting on clothes over underwear bearing odious bumps and lumps, but she’s mastering the serious use of new materials and technology within the art of industrial design. Bent on eliminating a world full of VPL (that’s visible panty lines for those of you who don’t get out much), Haughton is also creating completely tailored, customized under-apparel, meaning yes, you can also wear these styles even if you don’t have the perfect bod, as (ahem!) seen in the images here.

 

“Stretch silicone is amazing to work with and could really change the way lingerie is made. It’s very strong and flexible when cured, and is practically impossible to unstick,” said Haughton. “It also has an amazing feel to it, and when 3D printed can create more intricate detailing than traditional methods.”

In terms of ornamentation, she is able to imbue these pretty sexy styles with plenty of complex detail.

“In many ways, when printed onto sheer mesh as a floral pattern, it’s like a modern alternative to lace,” she noted.

 

‘I wanted to create something which was as close to the skin as possible and get rid of the lumps and bumps of traditional underwear.”’

stretch silicone material

Pointing out that it’s elastic and stitching that cause all of those unsightly VPLs, with 3D printed silicone and bonded seams, the consumer is free of such problems. The lingerie remains smooth without a tendency to become misshapen as is the case with more traditional styles.

“Jess has showed real innovation in developing her range of products and has developed her knowledge of this new technology which she can expand upon when she leaves university and pursues her career,” Emma Prince, senior lecturer in fashion design at Nottingham’s School of Art & Design.

 

“It’s a great illustration of how modern technology can change the way clothing is made, leading to improvements in the performance of garments, their fit, and their market appeal.”

To date, the young designer has made a 3D printed bodysuit, bra, thong and knickers for her unique collection. The ‘bottom’ line here? Go ahead and eat the ice cream—you too can strut your stuff in smooth style, in any size, thanks to Jess’ mad design skills and malleable silicone material. The only thing you sacrifice in wearing 3D printed lingerie is that taboo VPL. Would this help you solve some pantyline issues? What are your thoughts on this fashion line? Discuss further over in the 3D Printed Panties forum at 3DPB.com.

[Source: Daily Mail]

 

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