Summit Mowers’ Monster Lawnmowers Rely on 3D Printed Parts From i.materialise

Share this Article

lawn2Summer is almost here, so it is likely that mowing the lawn is on many homeowners’ minds. For most of us, lawnmowers are just functional machines that help us keep the yard tidy. However, lawnmowers used for larger areas like cities and national parks, for example, require more power and a remote-controlled capacity so they can overcome slopes and obstacles while also avoiding erosion. This is where 3D printing comes in — according to a recent i.materialise blog post about remote-controlled lawnmowers with 3D printed parts.

The idea of a remote-controlled lawnmower can be traced back to a man named John Wright who first attempted to create one himself in the 1990’s, using the unlikely combination of a push mower, a remote-controlled car, and a Barbie Power Wheels Jeep. Later, when he had access to Google and Youtube after the 2008 housing market crash, Wright launched a business, Summit Mowers, which required about four years of research and development work to get off the ground. By 2016, 30 mowers have been sold, and many more people are interested in checking out Wright’s remote mowers.

According to i.materialise, these epic monster lawnmowers “will mow anything that comes in their way and have no problem traversing extreme 40 to 50 degree slopes from site to site thanks to their exceptionally wide rubber tracks.” Government municipalities are a common customer for these mowers, as local governments are responsible for maintaining many steep hills.lawn1Wright has turned to i.materilaise to 3D print some parts, designed in SketchUp, that ensure the mowers function properly. Here, he explains how 3D printing plays into the mowers’ overall design:

“Our electronics have to be able to withstand dust, vibration and water or possible gas/oil spills. Fragile circuit boards and 25HP remote control mowers is not a safe idea. We use servos to operate rocker switches that energize relays for the mower’s electrical system all mounted on a 3D printed bracket. The servo arms have to be positioned perfectly over the rocker switch to operate efficiently. The days of making the brackets by hand and using shims to line up the components is long gone thanks to i.materialise.”

Wright also reports he’d like to 3D print some of the mowers’ metal parts one day, also.

lawn4

The 3D printed bracket (see above) that carries the mounted relays for the mower’s electrical system proves to be an essential item for a mower that is fast gaining a reputation as a machine that runs better than traditional mowers. One example Wright gives of his mowers’ performance is taken from a city in Eastern Kentucky, where overpasses began to wash out and erode since traditional mowers can only mow up and down. Summit Mowers’ TRX-42-PRO mower is capable of mowing side to side, which prevents erosion, and it can even mow across washed out areas. The city purchased 3 units, which they’ve already put to use for over 1,000 hours of work. That is how well the mowers can work for large and complicated jobs.

We’ve heard of 3D printing enhancing many a traditional machine, and now we can add lawnmowers to this list with the example of Summit Mowers’ “epic monster mower” — which you can check out in the video below and at the company’s website. Discuss further in the Summer Mowers 3D Printed Relay Mount forum over at 3DPB.com.

 

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Blueprint Webinar: The Business Case for 3D Printing Spare Parts

3D Printing & Conductivity: Fabricating Ultra-Stretchable Conductors



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Using Casting, Graphene, and SLM 3D Printing to Create Bioinspired Cilia Sensors

  What Mother Nature has already created, we humans are bound to try and recreate; case in point: biological sensors. Thanks to good old biomimicry, researchers have made their own...

Sinterit’s SLS 3D Printing and Flexible Materials Used to Make Strong Textiles for Opera Costumes

Engineering, textiles, and additive manufacturing are different industries with different growth patterns, but they are connected by an important point: structures. Additionally, each of these industries have to struggle with...

Sponsored

nScrypt Delivers 1 Meter Factory in a Tool to the US Army

Precision Micro-Dispensing and 3D printing manufacturer, nScrypt, based in Orlando, FL, whose bioprinter will travel to the International Space Station in 2019, has delivered a 3Dn-1000 multi-material Factory in a...

Sponsored

Sinterit is Going White

Is it possible to achieve white color on a small SLS 3D printer? This question was asked a hundred times. Somehow clients love white materials, but in selective laser sintering...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!